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Top job challenge in 2024: How do you transition smoothly onto a new team?

Starting a new job today and integrating smoothly with a work team can be a challenge, but hiring and career experts shared 10 key tips for achieving success in this endeavor.

If you're starting a new job, it’s very normal to be nervous, no matter your age, experience or job level.

Whether it’s an entry level position or a managerial role, day one at a new workplace can be a mixture of new opportunities and a learning curve. 

"Starting a new job can feel like the first day of school," Don Alix, district manager at Insperity and based in Phoenix, Arizona, told FOX Business. 

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"You may have some nerves, but proper preparation can help make a smooth transition."

Here's a deeper dive into a common career challenge.

Joining a new staff and understanding the corporate culture will take some time. 

There are ways to move in the right direction.

Here are 10 smart tips from experts. 

Before your first day, it’s a good move to learn what you can about your new employer, advised Alix. 

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For example, read profiles of their top executives and dive into recent news. 

This will help you get the lay of the land.

Pay careful attention so you’re more familiar with the workflow processes and the office dynamics. 

Experts also suggest you write down your questions and concerns along the way for later discussion. 

"You don’t need to learn everything on day one, but you should think about a few key things you’d want to know by the end of it, so write those down," Alix noted. 

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"Make sure to keep a running list of questions for information you’d like to learn later."

This strategy will better help you be prepared to understand the office hierarchy and policies, too.

"For many new employees, the priority is learning about those you report to and who is on your team, which decisions you will make and how your performance will be reviewed," he also said.

First impressions are critical, and since you’ll likely meet your manager and your core team on your first day, be on your "A game." 

Be prepared to quickly introduce yourself, highlight your experience and express excitement for your new role, much like an elevator speech, said Alix. 

"A well-delivered, brief introduction can quickly position you as a person who is prepared and enthusiastic to contribute to the company’s success," Alix told FOX Business.

We spend most of our waking hours with our colleagues, so it is important to get to know your team on a more personal level, Alix said. 

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"When you like who you work with and know what makes them tick, you’ll find yourself enjoying your work more," he said. 

As the "new kid on the block," demonstrating genuine interest and friendliness toward others will go a long way to opening up lines of communication. 

No matter if you enter the company as a person in leadership or at an entry level, listening is one of the best skills to exhibit. 

And, before making suggestions, Alix suggested listening and learning what is currently happening within the organization and the processes involved.

To gain a better understanding of the new corporate culture, Luck Dookchitra, VP of people and culture at Leapsome in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, suggested relying on your manager and peers for advice on how to navigate any social interactions that seem unfamiliar to you. 

"Every company, team and employee is different, so be open to adapting your expectations, as needed," Dookchitra told FOX Business. 

"That said, be vocal and consistent about what your new colleagues can expect from you — how you work, how you like to be approached, etc." 

If you’re not already assigned a "buddy" as a new hire, see if your manager or the HR team can connect you with someone, suggested Dookchitra. 

"At the end of the day, it’s all about building relationships — learning about your peers' and colleagues' professional histories, personal interests and even just asking about work dynamics can help open up some lines of communication," she said. 

"Onboarding done well is a journey, not a checklist you can fly through in the first week," stressed Dookchitra. 

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"The more time you spend intentionally, mindfully, and productively familiarizing yourself with your role, your team, company processes and manager expectations, the better set up you will be for long-term success in your new job." 

The existence of cliques in the workplace is a reality, experts said. 

But "showing genuine interest in people can break down the barriers," said Alix with Insperity.

"Rather than trying to break into a group right away, you may want to start connecting with people on a one-on-one level." 

In general, people do not embrace change well, Alix said.

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"Adding a new person to the work team disrupts the day-to-day rhythm," he added. 

So, when starting a new job, especially in a new industry, preparation is the most important part of success.

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"Learn as much as you can about the industry, the company and its competitors, and you will be ahead of the game," he said.

Additionally, he said, showing your willingness to openly communicate with your team and your manager or boss from the very beginning helps develop great working relationships from day one.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle.

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