Sign In  |  Register  |  About Burlingame  |  Contact Us

Burlingame, CA
September 01, 2020 10:18am
7-Day Forecast | Traffic
  • Search Hotels in Burlingame

  • CHECK-IN:
  • CHECK-OUT:
  • ROOMS:

Tony Snell seeking return to NBA for ‘bigger purpose’: ‘It’s about my boys’

NBA veteran Tony Snell is looking to join an NBA team's active roster by Friday and be signed for the rest of the season to be eligible for the union’s premium medical plan.

NBA veteran Tony Snell has not played in an NBA game since the 2021-22 season, when he appeared in 53 games for the Portland Trail Blazers and the New Orleans Pelicans. 

Snell is playing for the Maine Celtics, Boston’s G League affiliate, for the second straight season. 

The 2013 first-round draft pick is looking to return to the NBA because it’s the top of his profession. But he has another reason. 

LEBRON JAMES DROPS CRYPTIC POST AFTER LAKERS' 2ND STRAIGHT LOSS

"Of course, I want to come back and play, but I have a bigger purpose now," Snell told Yahoo Sports. "It’s not about me anymore. It’s about my boys."

Snell needs to be signed to an NBA active roster by Friday and be signed for the remainder of the season to get a 10th year of service. If Snell can get a 10th year of service, he would be eligible for the Players Association Union’s premium medical plan when he retires, according to Yahoo Sports. 

The premium medical plan would cover his entire family, including his two sons, who were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. 

CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM

"It’s something I truly need," Snell said. "Not only for myself, but for my wife and my kids."

Snell’s son Karter, 2, was diagnosed with autism, which led Snell to discover at 31 years old that he too is autistic. 

"I'm like, 'You know what, if he's diagnosed [with autism], then I think I am [on the autism spectrum] too.' So, that gave me the courage to go get checked up," Snell told "Today" in June. 

JASON KIDD SAYS LUKA DONCIC IN THE 'ATMOSPHERE' OF MICHAEL JORDAN, BETTER THAN DIRK NOWITZKI

Snell told "Today" his diagnosis came as a bit of a "relief."

"I was not surprised because I always felt different. It was just relief, like, ‘Oh, this why I am the way I am,’" he said.

"It made my whole life, like everything about my life made so much sense. It was like clarity, like putting some 3D glasses on," he said. 

Snell has taken on a mentor role with his G League teammates, often playing with teammates who are 10 years younger. 

"I want to share my knowledge with the young guys. I have enjoyment from helping them out and showing them what I see," Snell said. "I’m at the stage where I want to inspire people and help as many people as I possibly can."

Snell told "Today" in June that he has made it his mission to be a role model for his son and others, partnering with the Special Olympics

"Just want to change some lives and inspire people," Snell said. "I want to make sure my son knows that I have his back. When I was a kid, I felt different. But now I can show him that I’m right here with you. We’re going to ride this thing together, we’re going to grow together and we’re going to accomplish a lot of things together."

Snell has averaged 6.1 points, 2.3 rebounds and 1.1 assists in his NBA career. 

Fox News' Ryan Gaydos contributed to this report

Data & News supplied by www.cloudquote.io
Stock quotes supplied by Barchart
Quotes delayed at least 20 minutes.
By accessing this page, you agree to the following
Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions.
 
 
Copyright © 2010-2020 Burlingame.com & California Media Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.