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Cockpit window crack forces ANA Boeing flight in Japan to turn around

An All Nippon Airways flight was forced to turn around and land in Japan after a crack was discovered in the cockpit windshield, an airline spokesperson said.

A Japanese domestic flight was forced to turn around and land on Saturday after a crack was found on the cockpit window of the Boeing 737-800 aircraft in midair, an airline spokesperson said.

All Nippon Airways (ANA) Flight 1182 took off from Sapporp-New Chitose airport headed for Toyama airport, about 700 miles to the south, but reversed course after the crack was discovered on the outermost of four layers of windows surrounding the cockpit, the spokesperson said. 

There were no injuries reported among the 59 passengers and six crew, according to the ANA spokesperson.

"The crack was not something that affected the flight's control or pressurization," the spokesperson said.

FAA WILL KEEP BOEING 737 MAX 9 GROUNDED UNTIL 'EXTENSIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE IS CONDUCTED

The plane was a different model from Boeing's 737 MAX 9 airplanes, which have made headlines in recent weeks. On Jan. 5, a door plug blew out of an Alaska Airlines 737 MAX 9 in midair, which forced the plane to make an emergency landing. 

The 737 MAX 9's cabin depressurized at around 16,000 feet when the door plug blew out, causing a teen's shirt to be ripped off, but no serious injuries were reported. 

FAA PROBING WHETHER BOEING FAILED TO ENSURE PLANES WERE SAFE TO OPERATE

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) grounded all 737 MAX 9 planes after the incident pending a safety review. The FAA extended its order on Friday until "extemsive inspection and maintenance is condcted" and all the data is reviewed.

"We are working to make sure nothing like this happens again," FAA Administrator Mike Whitaker said Friday. "Our only concern is the safety of American travelers and the Boeing 737-9 MAX will not return to the skies until we are entirely satisfied it is safe."

ALASKA AIRLINES PASSENGERS SUE BOEING FOR ‘WAKING NIGHTMARE’

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Jennifer Homendy told Fox News' Neil Cavuto on Monday the incident could have been catastrophic if it had happened at a higher altitude. 

"If we think about a cruise altitude of about 30,000 or 35,000 feet, what is happening at that time?" Homedy said. "Flight attendants are providing service to the passengers. Passengers are up and moving. People are out of their seat belts. People are in lavatories. That would have been a much different scenario.

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Six passengers have announced a lawsuit against Boeing since the Alaska Airlines incident, claiming they suffered injuries and have emotional trauma. 

In the lawsuit filed in Washington state, the passengers claimed the oxygen masks that dropped from the ceiling were not functioning and said the rapid pressure change caused ears to bleed. Some claimed the incident caused bruises as well. 

FOX Business' Daniella Genovese, Brie Stimson and Reuters contributed to this report.

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