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In what world is fighting the Fed a good idea?

Preface: Explaining our market timing models We maintain several market timing models, each with differing time horizons. The "Ultimate Market Timing Model" is a long-term market timing model based on the research outlined in our post, Building the ultimate market timing model. This model tends to generate only a handful of signals each decade.
The Trend Asset Allocation Model is an asset allocation model that applies trend following principles based on the inputs of global stock and commodity prices. This model has a shorter time horizon and tends to turn over about 4-6 times a year. The performance and full details of a model portfolio based on the out-of-sample signals of the Trend Model can be found here.



My inner trader uses a trading model, which is a blend of price momentum (is the Trend Model becoming more bullish, or bearish?) and overbought/oversold extremes (don't buy if the trend is overbought, and vice versa). Subscribers receive real-time alerts of model changes, and a hypothetical trading record of the email alerts is updated weekly here. The hypothetical trading record of the trading model of the real-time alerts that began in March 2016 is shown below.


The latest signals of each model are as follows:
  • Ultimate market timing model: Sell equities*
  • Trend Model signal: Bearish*
  • Trading model: Neutral*
* The performance chart and model readings have been delayed by a week out of respect to our paying subscribers.

Update schedule: I generally update model readings on my site on weekends and tweet mid-week observations at @humblestudent. Subscribers receive real-time alerts of trading model changes, and a hypothetical trading record of those email alerts is shown here.

Subscribers can access the latest signal in real-time here.


A dovish tone?There were few substantial surprises from last week's FOMC decision. However, the market interpreted Powell's statements as slightly dovish. As a consequence, Fed Funds futures began to discount a pause in late 2022 and easing by March 2023, which is a significant change from the expectations before the meeting announcement.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell referred to the June Summary of Economic Projections, or dot plot, in the post-FOMC press conference as "probably the best estimate of where the Committee's thinking is still". The Daily Shot pointed out that the market is massively fighting against the dot plot, which is "a trajectory that looks too dovish, given the broad and entrenched inflationary pressures".


In what world does anyone think that massively fighting the Fed is a good idea?
The full post can be found here.
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