Form 10-Q
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

 

x

  

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF

THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2010

OR

 

¨

  

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Transition Period From                          to                            

Commission File Number 1-6541

LOEWS CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

  13-2646102  

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer  

Identification No.)

667 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10065-8087

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

(212) 521-2000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

NOT APPLICABLE

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes         X         No                   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

 

Yes         X         No                      Not Applicable                   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

    Large accelerated filer     X    

   Accelerated filer                Non-accelerated filer                Smaller reporting company                

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Yes                      No         X      

 

Class

     

Outstanding at April 28, 2010

Common stock, $0.01 par value

    418,496,799 shares

 

 

 


Table of Contents

INDEX

 

 

    

Page

No.

Part I.  Financial Information

  

Item 1.  Financial Statements (unaudited)

  

Consolidated Condensed Balance Sheets
March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009

   3

Consolidated Condensed Statements of Operations
Three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009

   4

Consolidated Condensed Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Three months ended March  31, 2010 and 2009

   5

Consolidated Condensed Statement of Equity
March 31, 2010

   6

Consolidated Condensed Statements of Cash Flows
Three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009

   7

Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements

   9

Item 2.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

   40

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

   64

Item 4.  Controls and Procedures

   64

Part II.  Other Information

   64

Item 1.  Legal Proceedings

   64

Item 1A.  Risk Factors

   65

Item 2.  Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

   65

Item 6.  Exhibits

   65

 

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PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.  Financial Statements.

Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

 

         March 31,        December 31,
     

2010

 

  

2009

 

(Dollar amounts in millions, except per share data)          

Assets:

     

Investments:

     

Fixed maturities, amortized cost of $37,591 and $35,824

       $ 38,104             $     35,816     

Equity securities, cost of $938 and $943

     1,047           1,007     

Limited partnership investments

     2,164           1,996     

 

Short term investments

 

  

 

 

 

 

6,187     

 

  

 

 

 

 

7,215     

 

 

Total investments

     47,502           46,034     

Cash

     135           190     

Receivables

     10,000           10,212     

Property, plant and equipment

     13,249           13,274     

Deferred income taxes

     869           627     

Goodwill

     856           856     

Other assets

     1,693           1,346     

Deferred acquisition costs of insurance subsidiaries

     1,109           1,108     

 

Separate account business

 

  

 

 

 

 

442     

 

  

 

 

 

 

423     

 

 

 

Total assets

 

  

 

    $

 

 

75,855     

 

  

 

    $

 

 

74,070     

 

 

Liabilities and Equity:

     

Insurance reserves:

     

Claim and claim adjustment expense

       $ 26,559             $ 26,816     

Future policy benefits

     8,090           7,981     

Unearned premiums

     3,283           3,274     

 

Policyholders’ funds

 

  

 

 

 

 

177     

 

  

 

 

 

 

192     

 

 

Total insurance reserves

     38,109           38,263     

Payable to brokers

     662           540     

Short term debt

     62           10     

Long term debt

     9,549           9,475     

Other liabilities

     5,038           4,274     

 

Separate account business

 

  

 

 

 

 

442     

 

  

 

 

 

 

423     

 

 

 

Total liabilities

 

  

 

 

 

 

53,862     

 

  

 

 

 

 

52,985     

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.10 par value:

     

Authorized – 100,000,000 shares

     

Common stock, $0.01 par value:

     

Authorized – 1,800,000,000 shares

     

Issued – 425,547,829 and 425,497,522 shares

     4           4     

Additional paid-in capital

     3,745           3,637     

Retained earnings

     14,085           13,693     

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

  

 

 

 

 

(75)    

 

  

 

 

 

 

(419)    

 

 
     17,759           16,915     

Less treasury stock, at cost (5,814,800 and 427,200 shares)

     (213)          (16)    
 

Total shareholders’ equity

     17,546           16,899     

Noncontrolling interests

     4,447           4,186     
 

Total equity

     21,993           21,085     
 

Total liabilities and equity

       $ 75,855             $ 74,070     
 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009
(In millions, except per share data)          

Revenues:

     

Insurance premiums

   $ 1,615     $ 1,672     

Net investment income

     617       447     

Investment gains (losses):

     

Other-than-temporary impairment losses

     (90)      (614)    

Portion of other-than-temporary impairment losses recognized in Other comprehensive income

     30    
 

Net impairment losses recognized in earnings

     (60)      (614)    

Other net investment gains

     81       83     
 

Total investment gains (losses)

     21       (531)    

Contract drilling revenues

     844       856     

Other

     616       579     
 

Total

     3,713       3,023     
 

Expenses:

     

Insurance claims and policyholders’ benefits

     1,308       1,342     

Amortization of deferred acquisition costs

     342       349     

Contract drilling expenses

     305       294     

Impairment of natural gas and oil properties

        1,036     

Other operating expenses

     732       776     

Interest

     130       94     
 

Total

     2,817       3,891     
 

Income (loss) before income tax

     896       (868)    

Income tax (expense) benefit

     (273)      395     
 

Net income (loss)

     623       (473)    

Amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests

     (203)      (174)    
 

Net income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation

   $ 420     $ (647)    
 

Basic and diluted net income (loss) per share

   $ 0.99     $ (1.49)    
 

Dividends per share

   $     0.0625     $     0.0625     
 

Weighted-average shares outstanding:

     

Shares of common stock

     422.77       435.12     

Dilutive potential shares of common stock

     0.87    
 

Total weighted-average shares outstanding assuming dilution

     423.64       435.12     
 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(Unaudited)

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009    
(In millions)          

Net income (loss)

   $     623     $     (473)    
 

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     

Changes in:

     

Net unrealized gains on investments with other-than-temporary impairments

     25    

Net other unrealized gains on investments

     307       399     
 

Total unrealized gains on available-for-sale investments

     332       399     

Unrealized gains on cash flow hedges

     61       15     

Foreign currency

     (10)      (7)    

Pension liability

          (1)    
 

Other comprehensive income

     385       406     
 

Comprehensive income (loss)

     1,008       (67)    

Amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests

     (245)      (223)    
 

Total comprehensive income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation

   $ 763     $ (290)    
 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENT OF EQUITY

(Unaudited)

 

          Loews Corporation Shareholders     
            Total          Loews
Common
Stock
   Additional
Paid-in
Capital
  

Retained

Earnings

   Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
   Common
Stock
Held in
Treasury
   Noncontrolling    
Interests

(In millions)

                    

Balance, January 1, 2010

   $     21,085         $ 4        $ 3,637        $     13,693         $ (419)        $ (16)        $ 4,186     

Sale of subsidiary common units

     279              83             1              195     

Net income

     623                 420                 203     

Other comprehensive income

     385                    343              42     

Dividends paid

     (192)                (26)                (166)    

Purchase of Loews treasury stock

     (197)                      (197)       

Issuance of Loews common stock

     1              1                

Stock-based compensation

     6              5                   1     

Other

     3              19          (2)                (14)    
 

Balance, March 31, 2010

   $ 21,993         $ 4        $ 3,745        $ 14,085         $ (75)        $ (213)        $ 4,447     
 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009 
 
(In millions)          

Operating Activities:

     

Net income (loss)

   $ 623     $ (473)    

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities, net

     175       1,360    

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net:

     

Reinsurance receivables

     254       16     

Other receivables

     (4)      76     

Deferred acquisition costs

     (1)      (7)    

Insurance reserves

     (135)      (139)    

Other liabilities

     (42)      (133)    

Trading securities

     (584)      457     

Other, net

          (19)    
 

Net cash flow operating activities

     294       1,138     
 

Investing Activities:

     

Purchases of fixed maturities

     (5,351)      (7,079)    

Proceeds from sales of fixed maturities

     2,737       7,046     

Proceeds from maturities of fixed maturities

     846       827     

Purchases of equity securities

     (42)      (134)    

Proceeds from sales of equity securities

     25       146     

Purchases of property, plant and equipment

     (212)      (567)    

Change in collateral on loaned securities and derivatives

          45     

Change in short term investments

     1,628       (1,457)    

Other, net

     (43)      65     
 

Net cash flow investing activities

   $ (411)    $ (1,108)    
 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010          2009        
 

(In millions)

       

Financing Activities:

       

Dividends paid

   $         (26)        $ (27)    

Dividends paid to noncontrolling interests

     (166)          (161)    

Purchases of treasury shares

     (188)       

Issuance of common stock

     1           1     

Proceeds from sale of subsidiary stock

     333        

Principal payments on debt

     (1)          (10)    

Issuance of debt

     125           171     

Policyholders’ investment contract net deposits (withdrawals)

     (2)          (7)    

Other, net

     (12)          12     
 

Net cash flow financing activities

     64           (21)    
 

Effect of foreign exchange rate on cash

     (2)          (2)    
 

Net change in cash

     (55)          7     

Cash, beginning of period

     190           131     
 

Cash, end of period

   $ 135         $ 138     
 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

 

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Loews Corporation and Subsidiaries

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

1. Basis of Presentation

Loews Corporation is a holding company. Its subsidiaries are engaged in the following lines of business: commercial property and casualty insurance (CNA Financial Corporation (“CNA”), a 90% owned subsidiary); the operation of offshore oil and gas drilling rigs (Diamond Offshore Drilling, Inc. (“Diamond Offshore”), a 50.4% owned subsidiary); exploration, production and marketing of natural gas and natural gas liquids (HighMount Exploration & Production LLC (“HighMount”), a wholly owned subsidiary); the operation of interstate natural gas pipeline systems (Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, LP (“Boardwalk Pipeline”), a 66% owned subsidiary); and the operation of hotels (Loews Hotels Holding Corporation (“Loews Hotels”), a wholly owned subsidiary). In the first quarter of 2010 the Company sold 11.5 million common units of its subsidiary, Boardwalk Pipeline, for $333 million, reducing the Company’s ownership interest from 72% to 66%. Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “Company,” “Loews” and “Registrant” as used herein mean Loews Corporation excluding its subsidiaries and the term “Net income (loss) – Loews” as used herein means Net income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation.

In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements reflect all adjustments (consisting of only normal recurring accruals) necessary to present fairly the financial position as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009 and the results of operations, comprehensive income (loss) and changes in cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009.

Net income (loss) for the first quarter of each of the years is not necessarily indicative of net income (loss) for that entire year.

Reference is made to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2009 Annual Report on Form 10-K which should be read in conjunction with these Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements.

The Company presents basic and diluted earnings per share on the Consolidated Condensed Statements of Operations. Basic earnings per share excludes dilution and is computed by dividing net income (loss) attributable to common stock by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted earnings per share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock. Stock options and stock appreciation rights (“SARs”) of 2.4 million shares were not included in the diluted weighted average shares amount for the three months ended March 31, 2010 due to the exercise price being greater than the average stock price. For the three months ended March 31, 2009, 5.6 million of common equivalent shares, consisting solely of stock options and SARs, are not included in the diluted weighted average shares amount as their effects are antidilutive.

Accounting changes – In June of 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued updated accounting guidance which amended the requirements for determination of the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity, required an ongoing assessment of whether an entity is the primary beneficiary and required enhanced interim and annual disclosures. The updated accounting guidance became effective for quarterly and annual reporting periods beginning after November 15, 2009, except for investment company type entities for which the requirements under this guidance have been deferred indefinitely. The adoption of this updated accounting guidance as of January 1, 2010 had no impact on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.

New accounting pronouncements not yet adopted – In March of 2009, the FASB issued updated accounting guidance which amends the accounting and reporting requirements related to derivatives to provide clarifying language regarding when embedded credit derivative features, including those in collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) and synthetic CDOs, are considered embedded derivatives subject to potential bifurcation. The updated accounting guidance is effective for the first quarter beginning after June 15, 2010. The Company is currently assessing the impact this updated accounting guidance will have on its financial condition and results of operations.

 

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2. Investments

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010     2009
(In millions)           

Net investment income consisted of:

    

Fixed maturity securities

   $ 510      $ 475     

Short term investments

     7        11     

Limited partnerships

     80        (70)    

Equity securities

     10        14     

Income from trading portfolio

     21        26     

Other

     3        3     
 

Total investment income

     631        459     

Investment expenses

     (14     (12)    
 

Net investment income

   $     617      $ 447     
 

Investment gains (losses) are as follows:

    

Fixed maturity securities

   $ 27      $     (358)    

Equity securities

     3        (216)    

Derivative instruments

     (13     31     

Short term investments

     3        14     

Other

     1        (2)    
 

Investment gains (losses) (a)

   $ 21      $ (531)    
 

 

(a) Includes gross realized gains of $102 and $108 and gross realized losses of $72 and $682 on available-for-sale securities for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009.

The components of other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) losses recognized in earnings by asset type are as follows:

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009
(In millions)          

Fixed maturity securities available-for-sale:

     

Asset-backed securities:

     

Residential mortgage-backed securities

   $     26    $     149     

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     2      16     

Other asset-backed securities

        31     
 

Total asset-backed securities

     28      196     

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax-exempt securities

     14   

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     18      190     

Redeemable preferred stock

        9     
 

Total fixed maturities available-for-sale

     60      395     
 

Equity securities available-for-sale:

     

Common stock

        3     

Preferred stock

        216     
 

Total equity securities available-for-sale

     -      219     
 

Net OTTI losses recognized in earnings

   $ 60    $ 614     
 

A security is impaired if the fair value of the security is less than its cost adjusted for accretion, amortization and previously recorded OTTI losses, otherwise defined as an unrealized loss. When a security is impaired, the impairment is evaluated to determine whether it is temporary or other-than-temporary.

 

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Significant judgment is required in the determination of whether an OTTI loss has occurred for a security. CNA follows a consistent and systematic process for determining and recording an OTTI loss. CNA has established a committee responsible for the OTTI process. This committee, referred to as the Impairment Committee, is made up of three officers appointed by CNA’s Chief Financial Officer. The Impairment Committee is responsible for evaluating securities in an unrealized loss position on at least a quarterly basis.

The Impairment Committee’s assessment of whether an OTTI loss has occurred incorporates both quantitative and qualitative information. Fixed maturity securities that CNA intends to sell, or it more likely than not will be required to sell before recovery of amortized cost, are considered to be other-than-temporarily impaired and the entire difference between the amortized cost basis and fair value of the security is recognized as an OTTI loss in earnings. The remaining fixed maturity securities in an unrealized loss position are evaluated to determine if a credit loss exists. In order to determine if a credit loss exists, the factors considered by the Impairment Committee include (i) the financial condition and near term prospects of the issuer, (ii) whether the debtor is current on interest and principal payments, (iii) credit ratings of the securities and (iv) general market conditions and industry or sector specific outlook. CNA also considers results and analysis of cash flow modeling for asset-backed securities, and when appropriate, other fixed maturity securities. The focus of the analysis for asset-backed securities is on assessing the sufficiency and quality of underlying collateral and timing of cash flows based on scenario tests. If the present value of the modeled expected cash flows equals or exceeds the amortized cost of a security, no credit loss is judged to exist and the asset-backed security is deemed to be temporarily impaired. If the present value of the expected cash flows is less than amortized cost, the security is judged to be other-than-temporarily impaired for credit reasons and that shortfall, referred to as the credit component, is recognized as an OTTI loss in earnings. The difference between the adjusted amortized cost basis and fair value, referred to as the non-credit component, is recognized as an OTTI loss in Other comprehensive income.

CNA performs the discounted cash flow analysis using stressed scenarios to determine future expectations regarding recoverability. For asset-backed securities, significant assumptions enter into these cash flow projections including delinquency rates, probable risk of default, loss severity upon a default, over collateralization and interest coverage triggers, credit support from lower level tranches and impacts of rating agency downgrades. The discount rate utilized is either the yield at acquisition or, for lower rated structured securities, the current yield.

CNA applies the same impairment model as described above for the majority of non-redeemable preferred stock securities on the basis that these securities possess characteristics similar to debt securities and that the issuers maintain their ability to pay dividends. For all other equity securities, in determining whether the security is other-than-temporarily impaired, the Impairment Committee considers a number of factors including, but not limited to: (i) the length of time and the extent to which the fair value has been less than amortized cost, (ii) the financial condition and near term prospects of the issuer, (iii) the intent and ability of CNA to retain its investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for an anticipated recovery in value and (iv) general market conditions and industry or sector specific outlook.

Prior to adoption of the updated accounting guidance related to OTTI in the second quarter of 2009, OTTI losses were not bifurcated between credit and non-credit components. The difference between fair value and amortized cost was recognized in earnings for all securities for which the Company did not expect to recover the amortized cost basis, or for which the Company did not have the ability and intent to hold until recovery of fair value to amortized cost.

 

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The amortized cost and fair values of securities are as follows:

 

     Cost or    Gross    Gross Unrealized Losses         Unrealized    
     Amortized    Unrealized    Less Than    12 Months    Estimated    OTTI
March 31, 2010    Cost    Gains    12 Months    or Greater    Fair Value    Losses
 
(In millions)                              

Fixed maturity securities:

                 

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of government agencies

   $ 165      $ 16    $ 1         $ 180   

Asset-backed securities:

                 

Residential mortgage-backed securities

     7,304      83      43        $ 406            6,938    $     265    

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     820      13      3      101            729   

Other asset-backed securities

     811      17      1      18            809   
 

Total asset-backed securities

     8,935      113      47      525            8,476      265    

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax-exempt securities

     6,458      191      24      316            6,309   

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     21,518      1,276      35      131            22,628      26    

Redeemable preferred stock

     51      9            60   
 

Fixed maturities available- for-sale

     37,127      1,605      107      972            37,653      291    

Fixed maturities, trading

     464      2         15            451   
 

Total fixed maturities

     37,591      1,607      107      987            38,104      291    
 

Equity securities:

                 

Common stock

     79      15         2            92   

Preferred stock

     572      49         32            589   
 

Equity securities available-for-sale

     651      64      -      34            681      -    

Equity securities, trading

     287      114      9      26            366   
 

Total equity securities

     938      178      9      60            1,047      -    
 

Total

   $ 38,529      $ 1,785    $ 116        $ 1,047            $ 39,151    $ 291    
 

December 31, 2009

                 
 

Fixed maturity securities:

                 

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of government agencies

   $ 184      $ 16    $ 1         $ 199   

Asset-backed securities:

                 

Residential mortgage-backed securities

     7,470      72      43        $ 561            6,938    $ 246    

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     709      10      1      134            584      3    

Other asset-backed securities

     858      14      1      39            832   
 

Total asset-backed securities

     9,037      96      45      734            8,354      249    

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax-exempt securities

     7,142      201      25      325            6,993   

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     19,015      1,123      50      249            19,839      26    

Redeemable preferred stock

     51      4         1            54   
 

Fixed maturities available-for-sale

     35,429      1,440      121      1,309            35,439      275    

Fixed maturities, trading

     395      3         21            377   
 

Total fixed maturities

     35,824      1,443      121      1,330            35,816      275    
 

Equity securities:

                 

Common stock

     61      14      1      1            73   

Preferred stock

     572      40         41            571   
 

Equity securities available-for-sale

     633      54      1      42            644      -    

Equity securities, trading

     310      109      10      46            363   
 

Total equity securities

     943      163      11      88            1,007      -    
 

Total

   $ 36,767      $ 1,606    $ 132        $ 1,418            $ 36,823    $ 275    
 

The amount of pretax net unrealized gains on available-for-sale securities reclassified out of Accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) into earnings was $32 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010.

Activity for the three months ended March 31, 2010 related to the pretax fixed maturity credit loss component reflected within Retained earnings for securities still held at March 31, 2010 was as follows:

 

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       Three Months Ended  
March 31, 2010
 

(In millions)

  

Beginning balance of credit losses on fixed maturity securities

     $ 164                 

Additional credit losses for which an OTTI loss was previously recognized

     11                 

Additional credit losses for which an OTTI loss was not previously recognized

     5                 

Reductions for securities sold during the period

     (9)                
 

Ending balance of credit losses on fixed maturity securities

     $ 171                 
 

Based on current facts and circumstances, the Company has determined that no additional OTTI losses related to the securities in an unrealized loss position presented in the March 31, 2010 summary of fixed maturity and equity securities table above are required to be recorded. A discussion of some of the factors reviewed in making that determination is presented below.

The classification between investment grade and non-investment grade presented in the discussion below is based on a ratings methodology that takes into account ratings from the three major providers, Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. and Fitch Ratings in that order of preference. If a security is not rated by any of the three, the Company formulates an internal rating. For securities with credit support from third party guarantees, the rating reflects the greater of the underlying rating of the issuer or the insured rating.

Asset-Backed Securities

The fair value of total asset-backed holdings at March 31, 2010 was $8,476 million which was comprised of 2,142 different asset-backed structured securities. The fair value of these securities does not tend to be influenced by the credit of the issuer but rather the characteristics and projected cash flows of the underlying collateral. Each security has deal-specific tranche structures, credit support that results from the unique deal structure, particular collateral characteristics and other distinct security terms. As a result, seemingly common factors such as delinquency rates and collateral performance affect each security differently. Of these securities, 202 have underlying collateral that is either considered sub-prime or Alt-A in nature. The exposure to sub-prime residential mortgage collateral and Alternative A residential mortgages that have lower than normal standards of loan documentation collateral is measured by the original deal structure.

Residential mortgage-backed securities include 270 structured securities in a gross unrealized loss position. In addition, there were 60 agency mortgage-backed pass-through securities which are guaranteed by agencies of the U.S. Government in a gross unrealized loss position. The aggregate severity of the gross unrealized loss was approximately 8.8% of amortized cost.

Commercial mortgage-backed securities include 35 securities in a gross unrealized loss position. The aggregate severity of the gross unrealized loss was approximately 16.4% of amortized cost. Other asset-backed securities include 40 securities in a gross unrealized loss position. The aggregate severity of the gross unrealized loss was approximately 6.5% of amortized cost.

 

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The asset-backed securities in a gross unrealized loss position by ratings distribution are as follows:

 

March 31, 2010    Amortized
Cost
   Estimated
Fair Value
   Gross
Unrealized    
Losses
(In millions)               

U.S. Government Agencies

   $     1,568    $     1,549    $ 19    

AAA

     1,933      1,752      181    

AA

     485      420      65    

A

     302      243      59    

BBB

     436      392      44    

Non-investment grade and equity tranches

     1,330      1,126      204    
 

Total

   $ 6,054    $ 5,482    $     572    
 

The Company believes the unrealized losses are primarily attributable to broader economic conditions, liquidity concerns and wider than historical bid/ask spreads, and are not indicative of the quality of the underlying collateral. The Company has no current intent to sell these securities, nor is it more likely than not that it will be required to sell prior to recovery of amortized cost. Generally, non-investment grade securities consist of investments which were investment grade at the time of purchase but have subsequently been downgraded and primarily consist of holdings senior to the equity tranche. Additionally, the Company believes that the unrealized losses on these securities were not due to factors regarding the ultimate collection of principal and interest, collateral shortfalls, or substantial changes in future cash flow expectations; accordingly, the Company has determined that there are no additional OTTI losses to be recorded at March 31, 2010.

States, Municipalities and Political Subdivisions – Tax-Exempt Securities

The tax-exempt portfolio consists primarily of special revenue and assessment bonds, representing 82.8% of the overall portfolio, followed by general obligation political subdivision bonds at 12.7% and state general obligation bonds at 4.5%.

The unrealized losses on the Company’s investments in tax-exempt municipal securities are due to market conditions in certain sectors or states that continued to lag behind the broader municipal market recovery. Market conditions in the tax-exempt sector continued to improve in the first quarter of 2010. However, yields for certain issuers and types of securities, such as zero coupon bonds, auction rate and tobacco securitizations, continue to be higher than historical norms relative to after tax returns on other fixed income alternatives. The holdings for all tax-exempt securities in this category include 313 securities in a gross unrealized loss position. The aggregate severity of the total gross unrealized losses was approximately 11.6% of amortized cost.

The tax-exempt securities in a gross unrealized loss position by ratings distribution are as follows:

 

March 31, 2010    Amortized
Cost
   Estimated
Fair Value
   Gross
Unrealized    
Losses
(In millions)               

AAA

   $     1,195    $     1,130    $ 65    

AA

     801      666      135    

A

     424      402      22    

BBB

     480      363      117    

Non-investment grade

     21      20      1    
 

Total

   $ 2,921    $ 2,581    $     340    
 

 

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The largest exposures at March 31, 2010 as measured by gross unrealized losses were special revenue bonds issued by several states backed by tobacco settlement funds with gross unrealized losses of $105 million, and several separate issues of Puerto Rico sales tax revenue bonds with gross unrealized losses of $79 million. All of these securities are rated investment grade.

The Company has no current intent to sell these securities, nor is it more likely than not that it will be required to sell prior to recovery of amortized cost. Additionally, the Company believes that the unrealized losses on these securities were not due to factors regarding the ultimate collection of principal and interest; accordingly, the Company has determined that there are no additional OTTI losses to be recorded at March 31, 2010.

Corporate and Other Taxable Bonds

The holdings in this category include 489 securities in a gross unrealized loss position. The aggregate severity of the gross unrealized losses was 3.4% of amortized cost.

The corporate and other taxable bonds in a gross unrealized loss position by ratings distribution are as follows:

 

March 31, 2010    Amortized
Cost
   Estimated
Fair Value
   Gross
Unrealized    
Losses
 
(In millions)               

Ratings distribution:

        

AAA

   $ 322    $ 316    $ 6    

AA

     791      785      6    

A

     1,368      1,332      36    

BBB

     1,691      1,617      74    

Non-investment grade

     680      636      44    
 

Total

   $  4,852    $ 4,686    $  166    
 

The unrealized losses on corporate and other taxable bonds are attributable to lingering impacts of the broader credit market deterioration primarily in the financial sector of the portfolio. Overall conditions in the corporate bond market have continued to improve in the first quarter of 2010, resulting in improvement in the Company’s unrealized position. The Company has no current intent to sell these securities, nor is it more likely than not that it will be required to sell prior to recovery of amortized cost. Additionally, the Company believes that the unrealized losses were not due to factors regarding the ultimate collection of principal and interest; accordingly, the Company has determined that there are no additional OTTI losses to be recorded at March 31, 2010.

The Company has invested in securities with characteristics of both debt and equity investments, often referred to as hybrid debt securities. Such securities are typically debt instruments issued with long or extendable maturity dates, may provide for the ability to defer interest payments without defaulting and are usually lower in the capital structure of the issuer than traditional bonds. The data in the table above includes financial industry sector hybrid debt securities with an aggregate fair value of $670 million and an aggregate amortized cost of $700 million.

 

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Table of Contents

Contractual Maturity

The following table summarizes available-for-sale fixed maturity securities by contractual maturity at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009. Actual maturities may differ from contractual maturities because certain securities may be called or prepaid with or without call or prepayment penalties. Securities not due at a single date are allocated based on weighted average life.

 

      March 31, 2010    December 31, 2009
      Amortized
Cost
   Estimated
Fair Value
   Amortized
Cost
  

Estimated    

Fair Value    

(In millions)                    

Due in one year or less

   $ 1,333    $ 1,325    $ 1,240    $ 1,219    

Due after one year through five years

     11,371      11,679      10,046      10,244    

Due after five years through ten years

     10,469      10,567      10,647      10,539    

Due after ten years

     13,954      14,082      13,496      13,437    
 

Total

   $   37,127    $   37,653    $   35,429    $   35,439    
 

Investment Commitments

As of March 31, 2010, the Company had committed approximately $243 million to future capital calls from various third-party limited partnership investments in exchange for an ownership interest in the related partnerships.

The Company invests in multiple bank loans as part of its overall investment strategy and has committed to additional future purchases and sales. The purchase and sale of these investments are recorded on the date that the legal agreements are finalized and cash settlements are made. As of March 31, 2010, the Company had commitments to purchase $337 million and sell $110 million of various bank loans.

3. Fair Value

Fair value is the price that would be received upon sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The following fair value hierarchy is used in selecting inputs, with the highest priority given to Level 1, as these are the most transparent or reliable:

 

   

Level 1 – Quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets.

 

   

Level 2 – Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations in which all significant inputs are observable in active markets.

 

   

Level 3 – Valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs are not observable.

The Company attempts to establish fair value as an exit price in an orderly transaction consistent with normal settlement market conventions. The Company is responsible for the valuation process and seeks to obtain quoted market prices for all securities. When quoted market prices in active markets are not available, the Company uses a number of methodologies to establish fair value estimates, including discounted cash flow models, prices from recently executed transactions of similar securities or broker/dealer quotes, utilizing market observable information to the extent possible. In conjunction with modeling activities, the Company may use external data as inputs. The modeled inputs are consistent with observable market information, when available, or with the Company’s assumptions as to what market participants would use to value the securities. The Company also uses pricing services as a significant source of data. The Company monitors all the pricing inputs to determine if the markets from which the data is gathered are active. As further validation of the Company’s valuation process, the Company samples its past fair value estimates and compares the valuations to actual transactions executed in the market on similar dates.

 

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The fair values of CNA’s life settlement contracts investments are included in Other assets. Derivative assets are included in Receivables and derivative liabilities are included in Payable to brokers. Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized in the tables below:

 

March 31, 2010    Level 1    Level 2    Level 3    Total    
(In millions)                    

Fixed maturity securities:

           

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of government agencies

   $ 130     $ 50        $ 180     

Asset-backed securities:

           

Residential mortgage-backed securities

        6,259     $ 679       6,938     

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

        617       112       729     

Other asset-backed securities

        441       368       809     
 

Total asset-backed securities

          7,317       1,159       8,476     

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax-exempt securities

        5,572       737       6,309     

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     118       21,830       680       22,628     

Redeemable preferred stock

          53            60     
 

Fixed maturities available-for-sale

     251       34,822       2,580       37,653     

Fixed maturities, trading

     147       88       216       451     
 

Total fixed maturities

   $ 398     $     34,910     $     2,796     $     38,104     
 

Equity securities available-for-sale

   $ 526     $ 147     $    $ 681     

Equity securities, trading

     366             366     
 

Total equity securities

   $ 892     $ 147     $    $ 1,047     
 

Short term investments

   $     5,676     $ 510     $    $ 6,187     

Receivables

        126            128     

Life settlement contracts

           131       131     

Separate account business

     44       358       40       442     

Payable to brokers

     (71)      (146)      (29)      (246)    

Discontinued operations investments, included in Other assets

     14       110       15       139     

 

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Table of Contents
December 31, 2009      Level 1        Level 2        Level 3        Total        
 

(In millions)

           

Fixed maturity securities:

           

U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of government agencies

   $ 145      $ 54         $ 199    

Asset-backed securities:

           

Residential mortgage-backed securities

        6,309      $ 629        6,938    

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

        461        123        584    

Other asset-backed securities

        484        348        832    
 

Total asset-backed securities

     —       7,254        1,100        8,354    

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax-exempt securities

        6,237        756        6,993    

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     139        19,091        609        19,839    

Redeemable preferred stock

     3        49        2        54    
 

Fixed maturities available-for-sale

     287        32,685        2,467        35,439    

Fixed maturities, trading

     102        78        197        377    
 

Total fixed maturities

   $ 389      $ 32,763      $ 2,664      $ 35,816    
 

Equity securities available-for-sale

   $ 503      $ 130      $ 11      $ 644    

Equity securities, trading

     363              363    
 

Total equity securities

   $ 866      $ 130      $ 11      $ 1,007    
 

Short term investments

   $     6,818      $ 397         $ 7,215    

Receivables

        53      $ 2        55    

Life settlement contracts

           130        130    

Separate account business

     43        342        38        423    

Payable to brokers

     (87)      (135)      (50)      (272)   

Discontinued operations investments, included in Other liabilities

     19        106        16        141    

 

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Table of Contents

The tables below present reconciliations for all assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009:

 

          Net Realized Gains
(Losses) and Net Change
in Unrealized Gains
(Losses)
  

Purchases,
Sales,
Issuances

and
Settlements

  

Transfers
into Level 3

  

Transfers

out of
Level 3

  

Balance,
March 31

  

Unrealized
Gains (Losses)    
Recognized in
Net Income on
Level 3 Assets
and Liabilities

Held at
March 31

2010    Beginning
Balance
   Included in
Net Income
   Included in
OCI
              
                                                         
(In millions)                                        

Fixed maturity securities:

                       

Asset-backed securities:

                       

Residential mortgage-backed securities

   $ 629      $     (10)    $ 26      $     42         $ (8)    $ 679      $     (11)    

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     123        (1)      (4)      (5)    $ 7      (8)      112        (2)    

Other asset-backed securities

     348        4        21        (5)            368     
 

Total asset-backed securities

     1,100        (7)      43        32        7      (16)      1,159        (13)    

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax- exempt securities

     756           2        (21)            737     

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     609        2        29        55        9      (24)      680     

Redeemable preferred stock

     2           2                 4     
 

Fixed maturities available-for-sale

     2,467        (5)      76        66        16      (40)      2,580        (13)    

Fixed maturities, trading

     197        6           13              216        6      
 

Total fixed maturities

   $     2,664      $ 1      $ 76      $ 79      $     16    $     (40)    $     2,796      $ (7)    
 

Equity securities available-for-sale

   $ 11               $ 2    $ (5)    $ 8     

Short term investments

                 1         1     

Life settlement contracts

     130      $ 10         $ (9)            131      $ 3    

Separate account business

     38              2              40     

Discontinued operations investments

     16         $ 1        (2)            15     

Derivative financial instruments, net

     (48)      (8)      14        15              (27)   

 

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Table of Contents
2009    Beginning
Balance
    Net Realized Gains
(Losses) and Net Change
in Unrealized  Gains
(Losses)
   

Purchases,
Sales,

Issuances
and
Settlements

    Transfers
into Level 3
   Transfers
out of
Level 3
   Balance,
March 31
   

Unrealized
    Gains (Losses)    
Recognized in
Net Income
(Loss)  on
Level 3 Assets

and Liabilities
Held at

March 31

     Included in
Net Income
(Loss)
    Included in
OCI
             
                                                            

(In millions)

                  

Fixed maturity securities:

                  

Asset-backed securities:

                  

Residential mortgage-backed securities

   $ 782      $ (17   $ 1      $ (23         $ 743      $ (19)    

Commercial mortgage-backed securities

     186        (10     (13     (5           158        (9)    

Other asset-backed securities

     139        (30     30        (40   $ 153         252        (32)    
 

Total asset-backed securities

     1,107        (57     18        (68     153         1,153        (60)    

States, municipalities and political subdivisions-tax- exempt securities

     750          37        (3           784     

Corporate and other taxable bonds

     622        (5     (1     204        2    $     (13)      809        (6)    

Redeemable preferred stock

     13        (9     8        7              19        (9)    
 

Fixed maturities available-for-sale

     2,492        (71          62        140        155    (13)      2,765        (75)    

Fixed maturities, trading

     218        3          (8           213     
 

Total fixed maturities

   $     2,710      $ (68   $ 62      $     132      $     155    $     (13)    $     2,978      $ (75)    
 

Equity securities available-for-sale

   $ 210                  $ 210     

Life settlement contracts

     129      $      11        $ (13           127      $      2     

Separate account business

     38        $ 1        (1           38     

Discontinued operations investments

     15          (1     (1           13     

Derivative financial instruments, net

     (72     18        (10     6              (58     24     

Net realized and unrealized gains and losses are reported in Net income (loss) as follows:

 

Major Category of Assets and Liabilities    Consolidated Condensed Statements of Operations Line Items
 
  
Fixed maturity securities available-for-sale    Investment gains (losses)
Fixed maturity securities, trading    Net investment income
Equity securities available-for-sale    Investment gains (losses)
Equity securities, trading    Net investment income
Derivative financial instruments held in a trading portfolio    Net investment income
Derivative financial instruments, other    Investment gains (losses) and Other revenues
Life settlement contracts    Other revenues

 

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Securities shown in the Level 3 tables may be transferred in or out based on the availability of observable market information used to verify pricing sources or used in pricing models. The availability of observable market information varies based on market conditions and trading volume and may cause securities to move in and out of Level 3 from reporting period to reporting period. The Company’s policy is to recognize transfers between levels at the beginning of the reporting period.

The following section describes the valuation methodologies used to measure different financial instruments at fair value, including an indication of the level in the fair value hierarchy in which the instrument is generally classified.

Fixed Maturity Securities

Level 1 securities include highly liquid government bonds within the U.S. Treasury securities category and debt securities issued by foreign governments, which are included in the corporate and other taxable bond category, for which quoted market prices are available. The remaining fixed maturity securities are valued using pricing for similar securities, recently executed transactions, cash flow models with yield curves, broker/dealer quotes and other pricing models utilizing observable inputs. The valuation for most fixed maturity securities is classified as Level 2. Securities within Level 2 include certain corporate bonds, municipal bonds, asset-backed securities, mortgage-backed pass-through securities and redeemable preferred stock. Level 2 securities may also include securities that have firm sale commitments and prices that are not recorded until the settlement date. Securities are generally assigned to Level 3 in cases where broker/dealer quotes are significant inputs to the valuation and there is a lack of transparency as to whether these quotes are based on information that is observable in the marketplace. These securities include certain corporate bonds, asset-backed securities, municipal bonds and redeemable preferred stock. Within corporate bonds and municipal bonds, Level 3 securities also include tax-exempt auction rate certificates. Fair value of auction rate securities is determined utilizing a pricing model with three primary inputs. The interest rate and spread inputs are observable from like instruments while the maturity date assumption is unobservable due to the uncertain nature of the principal prepayments prior to maturity.

Equity Securities

Level 1 securities include publicly traded securities valued using quoted market prices. Level 2 securities are primarily non-redeemable preferred securities and common stocks valued using pricing for similar securities, recently executed transactions, broker/dealer quotes and other pricing models utilizing observable inputs. Level 3 securities include equity securities that are priced using internal models with inputs that are not market observable.

Derivative Financial Instruments

Exchange traded derivatives are valued using quoted market prices and are classified within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. Level 2 derivatives include currency forwards valued using observable market forward rates. Over-the-counter derivatives, principally interest rate swaps, commodity swaps, credit default swaps, equity warrants and options are valued using inputs including broker/dealer quotes and are classified within Level 2 or Level 3 of the valuation hierarchy, depending on the amount of transparency as to whether these quotes are based on information that is observable in the marketplace.

Short Term Investments

The valuation of securities that are actively traded or have quoted prices are classified as Level 1. These securities include money market funds and treasury bills. Level 2 includes commercial paper, for which all inputs are observable. Level 3 securities include bank debt securities purchased within one year of maturity where broker/dealer quotes are significant inputs to the valuation and there is a lack of transparency to the market inputs used.

 

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Table of Contents

Life Settlement Contracts

The fair values of life settlement contracts are determined as the present value of the anticipated death benefits less anticipated premium payments based on contract terms that are distinct for each insured, as well as CNA’s own assumptions for mortality, premium expense, and the rate of return that a buyer would require on the contracts, as no comparable market pricing data is available.

Discontinued Operations Investments

Assets relating to CNA’s discontinued operations include fixed maturity securities and short term investments. The valuation methodologies for these asset types have been described above.

Separate Account Business

Separate account business includes fixed maturity securities, equities and short term investments. The valuation methodologies for these asset types have been described above.

Assets and Liabilities Not Measured at Fair Value

The Company did not have any financial instrument assets which are not measured at fair value. The carrying amount and estimated fair value of the Company’s financial instrument liabilities which are not measured at fair value on the Consolidated Condensed Balance Sheets are listed in the table below.

 

     March 31, 2010    December 31, 2009
 
     Carrying
Amount
   Estimated
Fair Value
   Carrying
Amount
   Estimated
Fair Value
 

(In millions)

           

Financial liabilities:

           

Premium deposits and annuity contracts

   $ 104            $ 105            $ 105    $ 106        

Short term debt

     62          62              10      10        

Long term debt

     9,549              9,836              9,475      9,574        

The following methods and assumptions were used in estimating the fair value of these financial liabilities.

Premium deposits and annuity contracts were valued based on cash surrender values, estimated fair values or policyholder liabilities, net of amounts ceded related to sold business.

Fair value of debt was based on quoted market prices when available. When quoted market prices were not available, the fair value for debt was based on quoted market prices of comparable instruments adjusted for differences between the quoted instruments and the instruments being valued or is estimated using discounted cash flow analyses, based on current incremental borrowing rates for similar types of borrowing arrangements.

4. Derivative Financial Instruments

The Company invests in certain derivative instruments for a number of purposes, including: (i) asset and liability management activities, (ii) income enhancements for its portfolio management strategy and (iii) to benefit from anticipated future movements in the underlying markets. If such movements do not occur as anticipated, then significant losses may occur.

Monitoring procedures include senior management review of daily detailed reports of existing positions and valuation fluctuations to ensure that open positions are consistent with the Company’s portfolio strategy.

The Company does not believe that any of the derivative instruments utilized by it are unusually complex, nor do these instruments contain embedded leverage features which would expose the Company to a higher degree of risk.

 

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The Company uses derivatives in the normal course of business, primarily in an attempt to reduce its exposure to market risk (principally interest rate risk, equity stock price risk, commodity price risk and foreign currency risk) stemming from various assets and liabilities and credit risk (the ability of an obligor to make timely payment of principal and/or interest). The Company’s principal objective under such risk strategies is to achieve the desired reduction in economic risk, even if the position does not receive hedge accounting treatment.

CNA’s use of derivatives is limited by statutes and regulations promulgated by the various regulatory bodies to which it is subject, and by its own derivative policy. The derivative policy limits the authorization to initiate derivative transactions to certain personnel. Derivatives entered into for hedging, regardless of the choice to designate hedge accounting, shall have a maturity that effectively correlates to the underlying hedged asset or liability. The policy prohibits the use of derivatives containing greater than one-to-one leverage with respect to changes in the underlying price, rate or index. The policy also prohibits the use of borrowed funds, including funds obtained through securities lending, to engage in derivative transactions.

The Company has exposure to economic losses due to interest rate risk arising from changes in the level of, or volatility of, interest rates. The Company attempts to mitigate its exposure to interest rate risk in the normal course of portfolio management, which includes rebalancing its existing portfolios of assets and liabilities. In addition, various derivative financial instruments are used to modify the interest rate risk exposures of certain assets and liabilities. These strategies include the use of interest rate swaps, interest rate caps and floors, options, futures, forwards and commitments to purchase securities. These instruments are generally used to lock interest rates or market values, to shorten or lengthen durations of fixed maturity securities or investment contracts, or to hedge (on an economic basis) interest rate risks associated with investments and variable rate debt. The Company infrequently designates these types of instruments as hedges against specific assets or liabilities.

The Company is exposed to equity price risk as a result of its investment in equity securities and equity derivatives. Equity price risk results from changes in the level or volatility of equity prices, which affect the value of equity securities, or instruments that derive their value from such securities. The Company attempts to mitigate its exposure to such risks by limiting its investment in any one security or index. The Company may also manage this risk by utilizing instruments such as options, swaps, futures and collars to protect appreciation in securities held.

The Company has exposure to credit risk arising from the uncertainty associated with a financial instrument obligor’s ability to make timely principal and/or interest payments. The Company attempts to mitigate this risk by limiting credit concentrations, practicing diversification, and frequently monitoring the credit quality of issuers and counterparties. In addition, the Company may utilize credit derivatives such as credit default swaps (“CDS”) to modify the credit risk inherent in certain investments. CDS involve a transfer of credit risk from one party to another in exchange for periodic payments.

Foreign exchange rate risk arises from the possibility that changes in foreign currency exchange rates will impact the fair value of financial instruments denominated in a foreign currency. The Company’s foreign transactions are primarily denominated in Australian dollars, Brazilian reais, British pounds, Canadian dollars and the European Monetary Unit. The Company typically manages this risk via asset/liability currency matching and through the use of foreign currency forwards. In May of 2009, Diamond Offshore began a hedging strategy and designated certain of its qualifying foreign currency forward exchange contracts as cash flow hedges.

In addition to the derivatives used for risk management purposes described above, the Company may also use derivatives for purposes of income enhancement. Income enhancement transactions are entered into with the intention of providing additional income or yield to a particular portfolio segment or instrument. Income enhancement transactions are limited in scope and primarily involve the sale of covered options in which the Company receives a premium in exchange for selling a call or put option.

The Company will also use CDS to sell credit protection against a specified credit event. In selling credit protection, CDS are used to replicate fixed income securities when credit exposure to certain issuers is not available or when it is economically beneficial to transact in the derivative market compared to the cash market alternative. Credit risk includes both the default event risk and market value exposure due to fluctuations in credit spreads. In selling CDS protection, the Company receives a periodic premium in exchange for providing credit protection on a single name reference obligation or a credit derivative index. If there is an event of default as defined by the CDS

 

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agreement, the Company is required to pay the counterparty the referenced notional amount of the CDS contract and in exchange the Company is entitled to receive the referenced defaulted security or the cash equivalent.

The tables below summarize CDS contracts where the Company sold credit protection as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009. The fair value of the contracts represents the amount that the Company would receive at those dates to exit the derivative positions. The maximum amount of future payments assumes no residual value in the defaulted securities that the Company would receive as part of the contract terminations and is equal to the notional value of the CDS contracts.

 

March 31, 2010    Fair Value
of Credit
Default
Swaps
   Maximum
Amount of
Future
Payments
under Credit
Default
Swaps
   Weighted
Average
Years
  To Maturity  
 

(In millions)

        

B

   $ 1        $ 8        2.9    
 

Total

   $ 1        $ 8        2.9    
 

December 31, 2009

        
 

B

      $ 8        3.1    
 

Total

      $ 8        3.1    
 

Credit exposure associated with non-performance by the counterparties to derivative instruments is generally limited to the uncollateralized fair value of the asset related to the instruments recognized on the Consolidated Condensed Balance Sheets. The Company attempts to mitigate the risk of non-performance by monitoring the creditworthiness of counterparties and diversifying derivatives to multiple counterparties. The Company generally requires that all over-the-counter derivative contracts be governed by an International Swaps and Derivatives Association (“ISDA”) Master Agreement, and exchanges collateral under the terms of these agreements with its derivative investment counterparties depending on the amount of the exposure and the credit rating of the counterparty. The Company does not offset its net derivative positions against the fair value of the collateral provided. The fair value of collateral provided by the Company was $13 million at March 31, 2010 and $7 million at December 31, 2009 and primarily consisted of cash and U.S. Treasury Bills. The fair value of cash collateral received from counterparties was $2 million at March 31, 2010 and $1 million at December 31, 2009.

The agreements governing HighMount’s derivative instruments contain certain covenants, including a maximum debt to capitalization ratio reviewed quarterly. If HighMount does not comply with these covenants, the counterparties to the derivative instruments could terminate the agreements and request payment on those derivative instruments in net liability positions. The aggregate fair value of HighMount’s derivative instruments that are in a liability position was $161 million at March 31, 2010. HighMount was not required to post any collateral under the governing agreements. At March 31, 2010, HighMount was in compliance with all of its covenants under the derivatives agreements.

See Note 3 for information regarding the fair value of derivative instruments.

 

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A summary of the aggregate contractual or notional amounts and gross estimated fair values related to derivative financial instruments follows. Equity options purchased are included in Equity securities, and all other derivative assets are reported as Receivables. Derivative liabilities are included in Payable to brokers on the Consolidated Condensed Balance Sheets. The contractual or notional amounts for derivatives are used to calculate the exchange of contractual payments under the agreements and may not be representative of the potential for gain or loss on these instruments.

 

     March 31, 2010    December 31, 2009
 
     Contractual/              Contractual/          
   Notional    Estimated Fair Value    Notional    Estimated Fair Value    
   Amount    Asset    (Liability)    Amount    Asset    (Liability)
 
(In millions)                              

With hedge designation

                 

Interest rate risk:

                 

Interest rate swaps

       $ 1,095       $ (94)    $ 1,600       $ (135)    

Commodities:

                 

Forwards – short

     656    $ 120      (23)      715    $ 50      (39)    

Foreign exchange:

                 

Currency forwards – short

     78      2      (1)      114      3   

Other

              13      2   

Without hedge designation

                 

Equity markets:

                 

Options – purchased

     173      26         242      45   

                    – written

     174         (6)      282         (9)    

Interest rate risk:

                 

Interest rate swaps

     514         (44)      9      

Credit default swaps

                 

                       – purchased

                             protection

     70         (5)      116         (11)    

                      – sold protection

     8      1         8      

       Futures – long

     58               

                      – short

     727            132      

Commodities:

                 

    Forwards – short

     41      13            

Foreign exchange:

                 

Currency options – short

     225         (8)         

Other

     8            2      
 

Total

       $ 3,827    $ 162    $ (181)    $ 3,233    $ 100    $ (194)    
 

Derivatives without hedge designation – For derivatives not held in a trading portfolio, new derivative transactions entered into totaled approximately $104 million and $6.1 billion in notional value while derivative termination activity totaled approximately $149 million and $6.1 billion during the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009. This activity was primarily attributable to credit default swaps and forward commitments for mortgage-backed securities.

 

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A summary of the recognized gains (losses) related to derivative financial instruments without hedge designation follows. Changes in the fair value of derivatives not held in a trading portfolio are reported in Investment gains (losses) and changes in the fair value of derivatives held for trading purposes are reported in Net investment income on the Consolidated Condensed Statements of Operations.

 

Three Months Ended March 31        2010           2009        
 

(In millions)

    

Included in Net investment income:

    

Equity risk:

    

Equity options – purchased

   $ (13   $ 5     

                                – written

     6     

Futures – long

     1     

                   – short

     (4  

Foreign exchange:

    

Currency forwards – long

       (8)    

                                        – short

       7     

Currency options – short

     2     

Interest rate risk:

    

Credit default swaps – purchased protection

       9     

                                          – sold protection

       (6)    

Options on government securities – short

       11     

Futures – long

     3        5     

                   – short

     3     

Other

     (1     (3)    
 
     (3     20     
 

Included in Investment gains (losses):

    

Equity options – written

       11     

Interest rate risk:

    

Interest rate swaps

     (26     21     

Credit default swaps – purchased protection

       (9)    

                                          – sold protection

       (6)    

Futures – short

       14     

Commodity forwards – short

     13     
 
     (13     31     
 

Total

   $ (16   $ 51     
 

Cash flow hedges – A significant portion of the Company’s hedge strategies represents cash flow hedges of the variable price risk associated with the purchase and sale of natural gas and other energy-related products. As of March 31, 2010, approximately 104.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas equivalents was hedged by qualifying cash flow hedges. The effective portion of these commodity hedges is reclassified from OCI into earnings when the anticipated transaction affects earnings. Approximately 47% of these derivatives have settlement dates in 2010 and 41% have settlement dates in 2011. As of March 31, 2010, the estimated amount of net unrealized gains associated with commodity contracts that will be reclassified into earnings during the next twelve months was $74 million. However, these amounts are likely to vary materially as a result of changes in market conditions. Diamond Offshore uses foreign currency forward exchange contracts to reduce exposure to foreign currency losses on future foreign currency expenditures. The effective portion of these hedges is reclassified from OCI into earnings when the hedged transaction affects earnings or it is determined that the hedged transaction will not occur. As of March 31, 2010, the estimated amount of net unrealized gains associated with these contracts that will be reclassified into earnings over the next twelve months was $1 million. The Company also uses interest rate swaps to hedge its exposure to variable interest rates or risk attributable to changes in interest rates on long term debt. The effective portion of the hedges is amortized to interest expense over the term of the related notes. As of March 31, 2010, the estimated amount of net unrealized losses associated with interest rate swaps that will be reclassified into earnings during the next twelve

 

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months was $64 million. However, this is likely to vary as a result of changes in the LIBOR rate. For the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009, the net amounts recognized due to ineffectiveness were less than $1 million.

In February of 2010, HighMount determined that a portion of the expected underlying transactions related to its cash flow hedging activities were no longer probable of occurring and discontinued hedge accounting treatment for a portion of its interest rate swaps and its commodity price swaps. In March of 2010, HighMount entered into a definitive agreement to sell substantially all of its exploration and production assets located in the Antrim Shale in Michigan and recorded a loss of $22 million in Investment gains (losses) in the Consolidated Condensed Statements of Operations, reflecting the reclassification of net derivative losses from AOCI to earnings.

The following table summarizes the effective portion of the net derivative gains or losses included in OCI and the amount reclassified into Income (loss) for derivatives designated as cash flow hedges:

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010    Amount of Gain
(Loss) Recognized
in OCI
   Location of Gain
(Loss) Reclassified
from OCI into
Income (Loss)
   Amount of Gain
(Loss) Reclassified
from OCI into
Income (Loss)
(In millions)               

Commodities

   $    104    Other revenues    $     30

Foreign exchange

      Contract drilling expenses             2

Interest rate risks

          (22)    Interest           (46)
 

Total

   $      82       $    (14)
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2009

        
 

Commodities

   $      92    Other revenues    $    74

Interest rate risks

            (9)    Interest          (14)
 

Total

   $      83       $    60
 

The Company also enters into short sales as part of its portfolio management strategy. Short sales are commitments to sell a financial instrument not owned at the time of sale, usually done in anticipation of a price decline. These sales resulted in proceeds of $53 million with fair value liabilities of $65 million at March 31, 2010. These positions are marked to market and investment gains or losses are included in Net investment income in the Consolidated Condensed Statements of Operations.

5. Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

CNA’s property and casualty insurance claim and claim adjustment expense reserves represent the estimated amounts necessary to resolve all outstanding claims, including claims that are incurred but not reported (“IBNR”) as of the reporting date. CNA’s reserve projections are based primarily on detailed analysis of the facts in each case, CNA’s experience with similar cases and various historical development patterns. Consideration is given to such historical patterns as field reserving trends and claims settlement practices, loss payments, pending levels of unpaid claims and product mix, as well as court decisions, economic conditions and public attitudes. All of these factors can affect the estimation of claim and claim adjustment expense reserves.

Establishing claim and claim adjustment expense reserves, including claim and claim adjustment expense reserves for catastrophic events that have occurred, is an estimation process. Many factors can ultimately affect the final settlement of a claim and, therefore, the necessary reserve. Changes in the law, results of litigation, medical costs, the cost of repair materials and labor rates can all affect ultimate claim costs. In addition, time can be a critical part of reserving determinations since the longer the span between the incidence of a loss and the payment or settlement of the claim, the more variable the ultimate settlement amount can be. Accordingly, short-tail claims, such as property damage claims, tend to be more reasonably estimable than long-tail claims, such as general liability and

 

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professional liability claims. Adjustments to prior year reserve estimates, if necessary, are reflected in the results of operations in the period that the need for such adjustments is determined.

Catastrophes are an inherent risk of the property and casualty insurance business and have contributed to material period-to-period fluctuations in the Company’s results of operations and/or equity. CNA reported catastrophe losses, net of reinsurance, of $40 million and $13 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 for events occurring in those periods. Catastrophe losses in the first quarter of 2010 related primarily to winter storms and the Chilean earthquake. There can be no assurance that CNA’s ultimate cost for catastrophes will not exceed current estimates.

The following provides discussion of the Company’s Asbestos and Environmental Pollution (A&E) reserves.

A&E Reserves

The Company’s property and casualty insurance subsidiaries have actual and potential exposures related to A&E claims.

The following table provides data related to the Company’s A&E claim and claim adjustment expense reserves.

 

     March 31, 2010    December 31, 2009
 
     Asbestos    Environmental
Pollution
   Asbestos     Environmental
Pollution
 

(In millions)

          

Gross reserves

   $           1,991       $ 467         $ 2,046      $ 482     

Ceded reserves

     (895)        (195)          (909     (196)    
 

Net reserves

   $           1,096       $ 272         $ 1,137      $ 286     
 

Asbestos

The table below provides a reconciliation between CNA’s beginning and ending net reserves for asbestos.

Asbestos Reserves

 

Three Months Ended March 31        2010           2009        
 
(In millions)           

Beginning net reserves

   $ 1,137      $ 1,202     

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development

     -        -     

Paid claims, net of reinsurance recoveries

     (41     (51)    
 

Ending net reserves

   $ 1,096      $ 1,151     
 

The ultimate cost of reported claims, and in particular A&E claims, is subject to a great many uncertainties, including future developments of various kinds that CNA does not control and that are difficult or impossible to foresee accurately. With respect to the litigation identified, pending rulings are critical to the evaluation of the ultimate cost to CNA. Accordingly, the extent of losses beyond any amounts that may be accrued are not readily determinable at this time.

Some asbestos-related defendants have asserted that their insurance policies are not subject to aggregate limits on coverage. CNA has such claims from a number of insureds. Some of these claims involve insureds facing exhaustion of products liability aggregate limits in their policies, who have asserted that their asbestos-related claims fall within so-called “non-products” liability coverage contained within their policies rather than products liability coverage, and that the claimed “non-products” coverage is not subject to any aggregate limit. It is difficult to predict the

 

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ultimate size of any of the claims for coverage purportedly not subject to aggregate limits or predict to what extent, if any, the attempts to assert “non-products” claims outside the products liability aggregate will succeed. CNA’s policies also contain other limits applicable to these claims and CNA has additional coverage defenses to certain claims. CNA has attempted to manage its asbestos exposure by aggressively seeking to settle claims on acceptable terms. There can be no assurance that any of these settlement efforts will be successful, or that any such claims can be settled on terms acceptable to CNA. Where CNA cannot settle a claim on acceptable terms, CNA aggressively litigates the claim. However, adverse developments with respect to such matters could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations and/or equity.

Certain asbestos claim litigation in which CNA is currently engaged is described below:

A.P. Green: In February 2003, CNA announced it had resolved asbestos-related coverage litigation and claims involving A.P. Green Industries, A.P. Green Services and Bigelow–Liptak Corporation. Under the agreement, CNA is required to pay $70 million, net of reinsurance recoveries, over a ten year period commencing after the final approval of a bankruptcy plan of reorganization. The settlement received initial bankruptcy court approval in August 2003. The debtor’s plan of reorganization includes an injunction to protect CNA from any future claims. The bankruptcy court issued an opinion in September 2007 recommending confirmation of that plan. In July 2008, the District Court affirmed the Bankruptcy Court’s ruling. Several insurers have appealed that ruling to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals; that appeal was argued in May 2009 and the parties are awaiting the court’s decision.

Direct Action Case - Montana: In March 2002, a direct action was filed in Montana (Pennock, et al. v. Maryland Casualty, et al. First Judicial District Court of Lewis & Clark County, Montana) by eight individual plaintiffs (all employees of W.R. Grace & Co. (“W.R. Grace”)) and their spouses against CNA, Maryland Casualty and the State of Montana. This action alleges that the carriers failed to warn of or otherwise protect W.R. Grace employees from the dangers of asbestos at a W.R. Grace vermiculite mining facility in Libby, Montana. The Montana direct action is currently stayed because of W.R. Grace’s pending bankruptcy. In April 2008, W.R. Grace announced a settlement in principle with the asbestos personal injury claimants committee subject to confirmation of a plan of reorganization by the bankruptcy court. The confirmation hearing was held in two phases. The first phase was held in June 2009. The second phase concluded in January 2010 and the bankruptcy court has taken the matter under advisement. The settlement in principle with the asbestos claimants has no present impact on the stay currently imposed on the Montana direct action and with respect to such claims, numerous factual and legal issues remain to be resolved that are critical to the final result, the outcome of which cannot be predicted with any reliability. These factors include: (a) the unclear nature and scope of any alleged duties owed to people exposed to asbestos and the resulting uncertainty as to the potential pool of potential claimants; (b) the potential application of Statutes of Limitation to many of the claims which may be made depending on the nature and scope of the alleged duties; (c) the unclear nature of the required nexus between the acts of the defendants and the right of any particular claimant to recovery; (d) the diseases and damages claimed by such claimants; (e) the extent that such liability would be shared with other potentially responsible parties; and (f) the impact of bankruptcy proceedings on claims resolution. Accordingly, the extent of losses beyond any amounts that may be accrued are not readily determinable at this time.

CNA is vigorously defending these and other cases and believes that it has meritorious defenses to the claims asserted. However, there are numerous factual and legal issues to be resolved in connection with these claims, and it is extremely difficult to predict the outcome or ultimate financial exposure represented by these matters. Adverse developments with respect to any of these matters could have a material adverse effect on CNA’s business, insurer financial strength and debt ratings and the Company’s results of operations and/or equity.

Environmental Pollution

The table below provides a reconciliation between CNA’s beginning and ending net reserves for environmental pollution.

 

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Environmental Pollution Reserves

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009
(In millions)          

Beginning net reserves

   $     286          $     262      

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development

     -            -      

Paid claims, net of reinsurance recoveries

     (14)          (14)    
 

Ending net reserves

   $ 272          $     248      
 

Net Prior Year Development

The following tables and discussion include the net prior year development recorded for CNA Specialty, CNA Commercial and Other Insurance. Favorable net prior year development of $9 million was recorded in the Life & Group Non-Core segment for the three months ended March 31, 2010. Included in this amount is favorable reserve development of $24 million arising from a commutation of an assumed reinsurance agreement. For the three months ended March 31, 2009 for the Life & Group Non-Core segment, unfavorable net prior year development of $11 million was recorded.

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010    CNA
Specialty
   CNA
Commercial
   Other
Insurance
   Total
(In millions)                    

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development:

           

Core (Non-A&E)

   $     (25)    $     (28)    $    $     (51)    

A&E

           
 

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year development before impact of premium development

     (25)      (28)           (51)    

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable premium development

     (4)      21       (1)      16      
 

Total pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year development

   $ (29)    $ (7)    $     1     $ (35)    
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2009

           
 

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development:

           

Core (Non-A&E)

   $ (29)    $ (42)    $    $ (70)    

A&E

           
 

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year development before impact of premium development

     (29)      (42)           (70)    

Pretax (favorable) unfavorable premium development

     (5)      20       (1)      14      
 

Total pretax (favorable) unfavorable net prior year development

   $ (34)    $ (22)    $    $ (56)    
 

2010 Net Prior Year Development

CNA Specialty

The favorable claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development was primarily due to favorable incurred loss emergence in several professional liability lines of business primarily in accident years 2007 and prior. This favorability was partially offset by unfavorable development in the employee practices liability line driven by higher unemployment, primarily in accident years 2008 and 2009.

 

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CNA Commercial

The favorable claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development was primarily due to favorable experience in non-catastrophe related property coverages in accident years 2007 and prior.

2009 Net Prior Year Development

CNA Specialty

The favorable claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development was primarily due to experience in liability coverages. This favorable development was the result of decreased frequency of large claims in accident years 2007 and prior.

An additional $7 million of favorable claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development was a result of favorable outcomes on claims relating to catastrophes in accident years 2005 and 2008.

CNA Commercial

The favorable claim and allocated claim adjustment expense reserve development was primarily due to experience in property coverages, including $31 million resulting from favorable frequency and severity on claims relating to catastrophes in accident year 2008.

6. Benefit Plans

Pension Plans - The Company has several non-contributory defined benefit plans for eligible employees. Benefits for certain plans are determined annually based on a specified percentage of annual earnings (based on the participant’s age or years of service) and a specified interest rate (which is established annually for all participants) applied to accrued balances. The benefits for another plan which cover salaried employees are based on formulas which include, among others, years of service and average pay. The Company’s funding policy is to make contributions in accordance with applicable governmental regulatory requirements.

Other Postretirement Benefit Plans - The Company has several postretirement benefit plans covering eligible employees and retirees. Participants generally become eligible after reaching age 55 with required years of service. Actual requirements for coverage vary by plan. Benefits for retirees who were covered by bargaining units vary by each unit and contract. Benefits for certain retirees are in the form of a Company health care account.

Benefits for retirees reaching age 65 are generally integrated with Medicare. Other retirees, based on plan provisions, must use Medicare as their primary coverage, with the Company reimbursing a portion of the unpaid amount; or are reimbursed for the Medicare Part B premium or have no Company coverage. The benefits provided by the Company are basically health and, for certain retirees, life insurance type benefits.

The Company funds certain of these benefit plans and accrues postretirement benefits during the active service of those employees who would become eligible for such benefits when they retire.

The components of net periodic benefit cost are as follows:

 

                 Other
             Pension Benefits             Postretirement Benefits    
      
Three Months Ended March 31    2010     2009     2010     2009
 
(In millions)                       

Service cost

   $ 6      $ 7      $ 1      $ 1       

Interest cost

     42        43        3        3       

Expected return on plan assets

     (44     (39     (1     (1)      

Amortization of unrecognized net loss

     7        7        1        1       

Amortization of unrecognized prior service cost

         (6     (6)      

Regulatory asset decrease

         1        1       
 

Net periodic benefit cost

   $ 11      $ 18      $ (1   $ (1)      
 

 

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7. Business Segments

The Company’s reportable segments are primarily based on its individual operating subsidiaries. Each of the principal operating subsidiaries are headed by a chief executive officer who is responsible for the operation of its business and has the duties and authority commensurate with that position. Investment gains (losses) and the related income taxes, excluding those of CNA, are included in the Corporate and other segment.

CNA’s core property and casualty commercial insurance operations are reported in two business segments: CNA Specialty and CNA Commercial. CNA Specialty provides a broad array of professional, financial and specialty property and casualty products and services, primarily through insurance brokers and managing general underwriters. CNA Commercial includes property and casualty coverages sold to small businesses and middle market entities and organizations primarily through an independent agency distribution system. CNA Commercial also includes commercial insurance and risk management products sold to large corporations primarily through insurance brokers.

CNA’s non-core operations are managed in two segments: Life & Group Non-Core and Other Insurance. Life & Group Non-Core primarily includes the results of the life and group lines of business that are in run-off. Other Insurance primarily includes certain corporate expenses, including interest on corporate debt, and the results of certain property and casualty business primarily in run-off, including CNA Re. This segment also includes the results related to the centralized adjusting and settlement of A&E.

Diamond Offshore’s business primarily consists of operating 47 offshore drilling rigs that are chartered on a contract basis for fixed terms by companies engaged in exploration and production of hydrocarbons. Offshore rigs are mobile units that can be relocated based on market demand. On March 31, 2010, Diamond Offshore’s drilling rigs were located offshore twelve countries in addition to the United States.

HighMount’s business consists primarily of natural gas exploration and production operations located in the Permian Basin in Texas, the Antrim Shale in Michigan and the Black Warrior Basin in Alabama. In April of 2010, HighMount sold its exploration and production assets located in the Antrim Shale in Michigan and entered into a definitive agreement with another purchaser to sell its exploration and production assets located in the Black Warrior Basin in Alabama.

Boardwalk Pipeline is engaged in the interstate transportation and storage of natural gas. This segment consists of three interstate natural gas pipeline systems originating in the Gulf Coast area and running north and east through Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois and Oklahoma.

Loews Hotels owns and/or operates 19 hotels, 17 of which are in the United States and two are in Canada. The Loews Atlanta Hotel, which is operated under a management contract, opened on April 1, 2010.

The Corporate and other segment consists primarily of corporate investment income, including investment gains (losses) from non-insurance subsidiaries, corporate interest expenses and other unallocated expenses.

The accounting policies of the segments are the same as those described in the summary of significant accounting policies. In addition, CNA does not maintain a distinct investment portfolio for each of its insurance segments, and accordingly, allocation of assets to each segment is not performed. Therefore, net investment income and investment gains (losses) are allocated based on each segment’s carried insurance reserves, as adjusted.

 

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The following tables set forth the Company’s consolidated revenues and income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation by business segment:

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009    

(In millions)

     

Revenues (a):

     

CNA Financial:

     

CNA Specialty

   $ 866     $ 690     

CNA Commercial

         1,073       836     

Life and Group Non-Core

     320       124     

Other Insurance

     56       (12)    
 

Total CNA Financial

     2,315       1,638     

Diamond Offshore

     862       886     

HighMount

     148       175     

Boardwalk Pipeline

     301       224     

Loews Hotels

     75       73     

Corporate and other

     12       27     
 

Total

   $ 3,713     $ 3,023     
 

Income (loss) before income tax and noncontrolling interest (a):

     

CNA Financial:

     

CNA Specialty

   $ 216     $ 55     

CNA Commercial

     163       (87)    

Life and Group Non-Core

     (21)      (240)    

Other Insurance

          (60)    
 

Total CNA Financial

     360       (332)    

Diamond Offshore

     405       451     

HighMount

     57           (1,006)    

Boardwalk Pipeline

     88       51     

Loews Hotels

     (1)      (29)    

Corporate and other

     (13)      (3)    
 

Total

   $ 896     $ (868)    
 

Net income (loss) - Loews (a):

     

CNA Financial:

     

CNA Specialty

   $ 123     $ 35     

CNA Commercial

     100       (44)    

Life and Group Non-Core

     (3)      (131)    

Other Insurance

          (30)    
 

Total CNA Financial

     225       (170)    

Diamond Offshore

     136       163     

HighMount

     32       (641)    

Boardwalk Pipeline

     38       22     

Loews Hotels

     (1)      (18)    

Corporate and other

     (10)      (3)    
 

Total

   $ 420     $ (647)    
 

 

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(a) Investment gains (losses) included in Revenues, Income (loss) before income tax and Net income (loss) - Loews are as follows:

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009

Revenues and Income (loss) before income tax and noncontrolling interest:

     

CNA Financial:

     

CNA Specialty

   $ 13         $     (109)    

CNA Commercial

     21           (186)    

Life and Group Non-Core

     (4)          (190)    

Other Insurance

     4           (47)    
 

Total CNA Financial

     34           (532)    

Corporate and other

     (13)          1     
 

Total

   $ 21         $ (531)    
 

Net income (loss) - Loews:

     

CNA Financial:

     

CNA Specialty

   $ 8         $ (63)    

CNA Commercial

     12           (108)    

Life and Group Non-Core

     (4)          (111)    

Other Insurance

     3           (28)    
 

Total CNA Financial

     19           (310)    

Corporate and other

     (8)       
 

Total

   $     11         $ (310)    
 

8. Legal Proceedings

On August 1, 2005, CNA and certain insurance subsidiaries were joined as defendants, along with other insurers and brokers, in multidistrict litigation pending in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey, In re Insurance Brokerage Antitrust Litigation, Civil No. 04-5184 (FSH). The plaintiffs allege bid rigging and improprieties in the payment of contingent commissions in connection with the sale of insurance that violated federal and state antitrust laws, the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (“RICO”) Act and state common law. After discovery, the District Court dismissed the federal antitrust claims and the RICO claims, and declined to exercise supplemental jurisdiction over the state law claims. The plaintiffs have appealed the dismissal of their complaint to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. The parties have filed their briefs on the appeal. Oral argument was held on April 21, 2009, and the Court took the matter under advisement. CNA believes it has meritorious defenses to this action and intends to defend the case vigorously.

The extent of losses beyond any amounts that may be accrued are not readily determinable at this time. However, based on facts and circumstances presently known, in the opinion of management, an unfavorable outcome will not materially affect the equity of the Company, although results of operations may be adversely affected.

CNA is also a party to litigation and claims related to A&E cases arising in the ordinary course of business. See Note 5 for further discussion.

The Company has been named as a defendant in the following three cases alleging substantial damages based on alleged health effects caused by smoking cigarettes, exposure to tobacco smoke or exposure to asbestos fibers incorporated into filter material used in one brand of cigarette that ceased manufacture more than 50 years ago, all of which also name a former subsidiary, Lorillard, Inc. or one of its subsidiaries, as a defendant. In Cypret vs. The American Tobacco Company, Inc. et al. (1998, Circuit Court, Jackson County, Missouri), the Company would contest jurisdiction and make use of all available defenses in the event it receives personal service of this action. In Clalit vs. Philip Morris, Inc., et al. (1998, Jerusalem District Court of Israel), the court initially permitted plaintiff to serve the Company outside the jurisdiction but it cancelled the leave of service in response to the Company’s application, and plaintiff’s appeal is pending. In Young vs. The American Tobacco Company, Inc. et al. (1997, Civil District Court, Orleans Parish, Louisiana), the Company filed an exception for lack of personal jurisdiction during 2000, which remains pending.

 

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The Company does not believe it is a proper defendant in any tobacco related cases and as a result, does not believe the outcome will have a material affect on its results of operations or equity. Further, pursuant to the Separation Agreement dated May 7, 2008 between the Company and Lorillard Inc. and its subsidiaries, Lorillard, Inc. and its subsidiaries have agreed to indemnify and hold the Company harmless from all costs and expenses based upon or arising out of the operation or conduct of Lorillard’s business, including among other things, smoking and health claims and litigation such as the three cases described above. Please read Item 1. Business - Separation of Lorillard and Note 19. Legal Proceedings of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements in the Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009 for additional information.

While the Company intends to defend vigorously all tobacco products liability litigation, it is not possible to predict the outcome of any of this litigation. Litigation is subject to many uncertainties. It is possible that one or more of the pending actions could be decided unfavorably.

The Company and its subsidiaries are also parties to other litigation arising in the ordinary course of business. The outcome of this other litigation will not, in the opinion of management, materially affect the Company’s results of operations or equity.

9. Commitments and Contingencies

Guarantees

In the course of selling business entities and assets to third parties, CNA has agreed to indemnify purchasers for losses arising out of breaches of representation and warranties with respect to the business entities or assets being sold, including, in certain cases, losses arising from undisclosed liabilities or certain named litigation. Such indemnification provisions generally survive for periods ranging from nine months following the applicable closing date to the expiration of the relevant statutes of limitation. As of March 31, 2010, the aggregate amount of quantifiable indemnification agreements in effect for sales of business entities, assets and third party loans was $819 million.

In addition, CNA has agreed to provide indemnification to third party purchasers for certain losses associated with sold business entities or assets that are not limited by a contractual monetary amount. As of March 31, 2010, CNA had outstanding unlimited indemnifications in connection with the sales of certain of its business entities or assets that included tax liabilities arising prior to a purchaser’s ownership of an entity or asset, defects in title at the time of sale, employee claims arising prior to closing and in some cases losses arising from certain litigation and undisclosed liabilities. These indemnification agreements survive until the applicable statutes of limitation expire, or until the agreed upon contract terms expire.

As of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, CNA has recorded liabilities of approximately $16 million related to indemnification agreements and management believes that it is not likely that any future indemnity claims will be significantly greater than the amounts recorded.

10. Consolidating Financial Information

The following schedules present the Company’s consolidating balance sheet information at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, and consolidating statements of operations information for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009. These schedules present the individual subsidiaries of the Company and their contribution to the consolidated condensed financial statements. Amounts presented will not necessarily be the same as those in the individual financial statements of the Company’s subsidiaries due to adjustments for purchase accounting, income taxes and noncontrolling interests. In addition, many of the Company’s subsidiaries use a classified balance sheet which also leads to differences in amounts reported for certain line items.

The Corporate and Other column primarily reflects the parent company’s investment in its subsidiaries, invested cash portfolio and corporate long term debt. The elimination adjustments are for intercompany assets and liabilities, interest and dividends, the parent company’s investment in capital stocks of subsidiaries, and various reclasses of debit or credit balances to the amounts in consolidation. Purchase accounting adjustments have been pushed down to the appropriate subsidiary.

 

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Loews Corporation

Consolidating Balance Sheet Information

 

March 31, 2010    CNA
Financial
   Diamond
Offshore
   HighMount    Boardwalk
Pipeline
   Loews
Hotels
   Corporate
and Other
   Eliminations     Total
(In millions)                                         

Assets:

                      

Investments

   $ 42,826    $ 933    $ 144    $ 113    $ 39    $ 3,447      $ 47,502    

Cash

     95      24      1      13      2           135    

Receivables

     8,908      808      164      89      39      138    $ (146     10,000    

Property, plant and equipment

     297      4,424      1,798      6,334      358      38        13,249    

Deferred income taxes

     1,133         583               (847     869    

Goodwill

     86      20      584      163      3           856    

Investments in capital stocks of subsidiaries

                    15,576      (15,576     -    

Other assets

     727      530      42      356      23      15        1,693    

Deferred acquisition costs of insurance subsidiaries

     1,109                       1,109    

Separate account business

     442                       442    
 

Total assets

   $ 55,623    $ 6,739    $ 3,316    $ 7,068    $ 464    $ 19,214    $ (16,569   $ 75,855    
 

Liabilities and Equity:

                      

Insurance reserves

   $ 38,109                     $ 38,109    

Payable to brokers

     289    $ 101    $ 183          $ 89        662    

Short term debt

        4          $ 58           62    

Long term debt

     2,304      1,487      1,600    $ 3,225      166      867    $ (100     9,549    

Deferred income taxes

        534         356      45      446      (1,381     -    

Other liabilities

     2,810      937      133      443      21      206      488        5,038    

Separate account business

     442                       442    
 

Total liabilities

     43,954      3,063      1,916      4,024      290      1,608      (993     53,862    
 

Total shareholders’ equity

     10,175      1,870      1,400      1,897      174      17,606      (15,576     17,546    

Noncontrolling interests

     1,494      1,806         1,147              4,447    
 

Total equity

     11,669      3,676      1,400      3,044      174      17,606      (15,576     21,993    
 

Total liabilities and equity

   $     55,623    $     6,739    $     3,316    $     7,068    $     464    $     19,214    $ (16,569   $     75,855    
 

 

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Loews Corporation

Consolidating Balance Sheet Information

 

December 31, 2009    CNA
Financial
   Diamond
Offshore
   HighMount    Boardwalk
Pipeline
   Loews
Hotels
   Corporate
and Other
   Eliminations     Total

(In millions)

                      

Assets:

                      

Investments

   $ 41,996    $ 739    $ 80    $ 46    $ 61    $ 3,112      $ 46,034    

Cash

     140      39      3      4      2      2        190    

Receivables

     9,104      794      97      110      27      202    $ (122     10,212    

Property, plant and equipment

     304      4,442      1,778      6,348      362      40        13,274    

Deferred income taxes

     1,368         636               (1,377     627    

Goodwill

     86      20      584      163      3           856    

Investments in capital stocks of subsidiaries

                    15,276      (15,276     -    

Other assets

     712      220      47      343      19      5        1,346    

Deferred acquisition costs of insurance subsidiaries

     1,108                       1,108    

Separate account business

     423                       423    
 

Total assets

   $ 55,241    $ 6,254    $ 3,225    $ 7,014    $ 474    $ 18,637    $ (16,775   $ 74,070    
 

Liabilities and Equity:

                      

Insurance reserves

   $ 38,263                     $ 38,263    

Payable to brokers

     253       $ 196          $ 91        540    

Short term debt

      $ 4          $ 6           10    

Long term debt

     2,303      1,487      1,600    $ 3,100      218      867    $ (100     9,475    

Deferred income taxes

        539         369      38      431      (1,377     -    

Other liabilities

     2,889      560      112      416      38      281      (22     4,274    

Separate account business

     423                       423    
 

Total liabilities

     44,131      2,590      1,908      3,885      300      1,670      (1,499     52,985    
 

Total shareholders’ equity

     9,674      1,864      1,317      2,179      174      16,967      (15,276     16,899    

Noncontrolling interests

     1,436      1,800         950              4,186    
 

Total equity

     11,110      3,664      1,317      3,129      174      16,967      (15,276     21,085    
 

Total liabilities and equity

   $ 55,241    $ 6,254    $ 3,225    $ 7,014    $ 474    $ 18,637    $ (16,775   $ 74,070    
 

 

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Loews Corporation

Consolidating Statement of Operations Information

 

Three Months Ended March 31,
2010
   CNA
Financial
    Diamond
Offshore
    HighMount     Boardwalk
Pipeline
    Loews
Hotels
    Corporate
and Other
    Eliminations    Total     

(In millions)

                 

Revenues:

                 

Insurance premiums

   $ 1,615                   $      1,615     

Net investment income

     590      $ 1            $ 26           617     

Intercompany interest and dividends

                    237      $    (237)      -     

Investment gains (losses)

     34        $ (13              21     

Contract drilling revenues

            844                   844     

Other

     76        17             148      $      301      $      75        (1        616     
 

Total

          2,315        862        135        301        75        262          (237)      3,713     
 

Expenses:

                 

Insurance claims and policyholders’ benefits

     1,308                     1,308     

Amortization of deferred acquisition costs

     342                     342     

Contract drilling expenses

       305                   305     

Other operating expenses

     269        130        72        176        74        11           732     

Interest

     36        22        19        37        2        16          (2)      130     
 

Total

     1,955        457        91        213        76        27          (2)      2,817     
 

Income (loss) before income tax

     360        405        44        88        (1     235          (235)      896     

Income tax expense

     (103     (125     (20     (23       (2        (273)    
 

Net income (loss)

     257        280        24        65        (1     233          (235)      623     

Amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests

     (32     (144       (27            (203)    
 

Net income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation

   $ 225      $ 136      $ 24      $ 38      $ (1   $ 233      $    (235)    $ 420     
 

 

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Loews Corporation

Consolidating Statement of Operations Information

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2009    CNA
Financial
    Diamond
Offshore
    HighMount     Boardwalk
Pipeline
    Loews
Hotels
    Corporate
and Other
   Eliminations     Total

(In millions)

                 

Revenues:

                 

Insurance premiums

   $ 1,672                   $     1,672     

Net investment income

     420      $ 1            $ 26        447     

Intercompany interest and dividends

               235    $ (235     -     

Investment gains (losses)

     (532     1                   (531)    

Contract drilling revenues

       856                   856     

Other

     78        29      $ 175      $ 224      $ 73             579     
 

Total

     1,638        887        175        224        73        261      (235     3,023     
 

Expenses:

                 

Insurance claims and policyholders’ benefits

     1,342                     1,342     

Amortization of deferred acquisition costs

     349                     349     

Contract drilling expenses

       294                   294     

Impairment of natural gas and oil properties

         1,036                 1,036     

Other operating expenses

     248        140        126        146        100        16        776     

Interest

     31        1        19        27        2        14        94     
 

Total

     1,970        435        1,181        173        102        30      -        3,891    
 

Income (loss) before income tax

     (332     452        (1,006     51        (29     231      (235     (868)    

Income tax (expense) benefit

     149        (116     365        (15     11        1        395     
 

Net income (loss)

     (183     336        (641     36        (18     232      (235     (473)    

Amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests

     13        (173       (14            (174)    
 

Net income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation

   $ (170   $ 163      $ (641   $ 22      $ (18   $ 232    $ (235   $ (647)    
 

 

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Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations (“MD&A”) should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included in Item 1 of this Report, Risk Factors included in Part II, Item 1A of this Report, and the Consolidated Financial Statements, Risk Factors, and MD&A included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009. This MD&A is comprised of the following sections:

 

         Page    
No.

Overview

   40    

Consolidated Financial Results

   40    

Parent Company Structure

   41    

Critical Accounting Estimates

   41    

Results of Operations by Business Segment

   42    

CNA Financial

   42    

CNA Specialty

   43    

CNA Commercial

   44    

Life and Group Non-Core

   45    

Other Insurance

   46    

Diamond Offshore

   46    

HighMount

   49    

Boardwalk Pipeline

   51    

Loews Hotels

   54    

Corporate and Other

   54    

Liquidity and Capital Resources

   55    

CNA Financial

   55    

Diamond Offshore

   55    

HighMount

   56    

Boardwalk Pipeline

   56    

Loews Hotels

   57    

Corporate and Other

   57    

Investments

   57    

Accounting Standards Update

   61    

Forward-Looking Statements

   61    

OVERVIEW

We are a holding company. Our subsidiaries are engaged in the following lines of business:

 

   

commercial property and casualty insurance (CNA Financial Corporation (“CNA”), a 90% owned subsidiary);

 

   

operation of offshore oil and gas drilling rigs (Diamond Offshore Drilling, Inc. (“Diamond Offshore”), a 50.4% owned subsidiary);

 

   

exploration, production and marketing of natural gas, natural gas liquids and, to a lesser extent, oil (HighMount Exploration & Production LLC (“HighMount”), a wholly owned subsidiary);

 

   

operation of interstate natural gas transmission pipeline systems (Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, LP (“Boardwalk Pipeline”), a 66% owned subsidiary); and

 

   

operation of hotels (Loews Hotels Holding Corporation (“Loews Hotels”), a wholly owned subsidiary).

Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this report to “Loews Corporation,” “the Company,” “we,” “our,” “us” or like terms refer to the business of Loews Corporation excluding its subsidiaries.

Consolidated Financial Results

Consolidated results for the first quarter of 2010 amounted to net income of $420 million, or $0.99 per share compared to a net loss of $647 million, or $1.49 per share in the 2009 first quarter.

 

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Income before net investment gains improved by $746 million in the first quarter of 2010 compared to the prior year period, primarily due to the absence of a non-cash impairment charge of $1.0 billion ($660 million after tax) related to the carrying value of HighMount’s natural gas and oil properties included in the prior year period. This charge reflected declines in commodity prices. In addition, higher investment income at CNA, primarily from improved performance in limited partnerships and fixed maturities, also contributed to the improvement, partially offset by decreased earnings at Diamond Offshore reflecting lower operating income and increased interest expense.

Net income included net investment gains of $11 million (after tax and noncontrolling interest) in the first quarter of 2010 compared to net investment losses of $310 million in the comparable prior year period. Net investment gains in the first quarter of 2010 reflect other-than-temporary impairment losses of $35 million (after tax and noncontrolling interest) compared to $359 million in the prior year period.

Book value per common share increased to $41.80 at March 31, 2010, as compared to $39.76 at December 31, 2009.

Parent Company Structure

We are a holding company and derive substantially all of our cash flow from our subsidiaries. We rely upon our invested cash balances and distributions from our subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to meet our obligations and to declare and pay any dividends to our shareholders. The ability of our subsidiaries to pay dividends is subject to, among other things, the availability of sufficient earnings and funds in such subsidiaries, applicable state laws, including in the case of the insurance subsidiaries of CNA, laws and rules governing the payment of dividends by regulated insurance companies and compliance with covenants in their respective loan agreements. Claims of creditors of our subsidiaries will generally have priority as to the assets of such subsidiaries over our claims and those of our creditors and shareholders.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES

The preparation of the consolidated condensed financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and the related notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

The consolidated condensed financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared in accordance with GAAP, applied on a consistent basis. We continually evaluate the accounting policies and estimates used to prepare the consolidated condensed financial statements. In general, our estimates are based on historical experience, evaluation of current trends, information from third party professionals and various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the known facts and circumstances.

We consider the accounting policies discussed below to be critical to an understanding of our consolidated condensed financial statements as their application places the most significant demands on our judgment.

 

   

Insurance Reserves

 

   

Reinsurance

 

   

Litigation

 

   

Valuation of Investments and Impairment of Securities

 

   

Long Term Care Products

 

   

Payout Annuity Contracts

 

   

Pension and Postretirement Benefit Obligations

 

   

Valuation of HighMount’s Proved Reserves

 

   

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

   

Goodwill

 

   

Income Taxes

Due to the inherent uncertainties involved with these types of judgments, actual results could differ significantly from estimates, which may have a material adverse impact on our results of operations or equity. See the Critical Accounting Estimates section and the Results of Operations by Business Segment – CNA Financial – Reserves – Estimates and Uncertainties section of our MD&A included under Item 7 of our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009 for further information.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS BY BUSINESS SEGMENT

Unless the context otherwise requires, references to net operating income (loss), net realized investment results, net income (loss) and net results reflect amounts attributable to Loews Corporation.

CNA Financial

The following table summarizes the results of operations for CNA for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 as presented in Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included in Item 1 of this Report:

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010     2009
(In millions)           

Revenues:

    

Insurance premiums

   $     1,615      $ 1,672     

Net investment income

     590        420     

Investment gains (losses)

     34        (532)    

Other revenue

     76        78     
 

Total

     2,315        1,638     
 

Expenses:

    

Insurance claims and policyholder benefits

     1,308        1,342     

Amortization of deferred acquisition costs

     342        349     

Other operating

     269        248     

Interest

     36        31     
 

Total

     1,955        1,970     
 

Income (loss) before income tax

     360        (332)    

Income tax (expense) benefit

     (103     149     
 

Net income (loss)

     257        (183)    

Amounts attributable to noncontrolling interests

     (32     13     
 

Net income (loss) attributable to Loews Corporation

   $ 225        $      (170)    
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010 Compared to 2009

Net results improved $395 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared to the same period in 2009. This improvement was driven by significantly improved net investment gains of $566 million ($329 million after tax and noncontrolling interest) and increased net investment income of $170 million. Net investment gains (losses) for the three months ended March 31, 2010 included other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) losses of $35 million (after tax and noncontrolling interest) compared to $359 million for the three months ended March 31, 2009. See the Investments section of this MD&A for further discussion of net realized investment results and net investment income. The overall improvement was partially offset by costs associated with CNA’s Information Technology (“IT”) Transformation as discussed below. CNA was also unfavorably impacted by higher catastrophe losses and decreased favorable net prior year development. Catastrophe losses were $23 million after tax and noncontrolling interest in the first quarter of 2010, as compared to catastrophe losses of $7 million after tax and noncontrolling interest in the first quarter of 2009. Favorable net prior year development of $35 million and $56 million was recorded for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009. Further information on net prior year development for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 is included in Note 5 of the Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included under Item 1.

CNA has commenced a program to significantly transform its IT organization and delivery model. CNA anticipates that the total costs for this program will be approximately $41 million, of which $25 million was incurred during the first quarter of 2010. When the results of this program are fully operational, CNA anticipates annual savings based on its current level of IT spending. A significant portion of the annual savings is anticipated to be achieved in 2011 with full annual savings in 2012. Some or all of these estimated savings may be invested in IT or other enhancements necessary to support CNA’s business strategies.

CNA Segment Results

CNA utilizes the net operating income financial measure to monitor its operations. Net operating income is calculated by excluding from net income (loss) after tax and noncontrolling interest the effects of (i) net realized investment gains or losses, (ii) income or loss from discontinued operations and (iii) any cumulative effects of changes in accounting guidance. See further discussion regarding how CNA manages its business in Note 7 of the Consolidated Condensed

 

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Financial Statements included under Item 1. In evaluating the results of the CNA Specialty and CNA Commercial segments, CNA utilizes the loss ratio, the expense ratio, the dividend ratio and the combined ratio. These ratios are calculated using GAAP financial results. The loss ratio is the percentage of net incurred claim and claim adjustment expenses to net earned premiums. The expense ratio is the percentage of insurance underwriting and acquisition expenses, including the amortization of deferred acquisition costs, to net earned premiums. The dividend ratio is the ratio of policyholders’ dividends incurred to net earned premiums. The combined ratio is the sum of the loss, expense and dividend ratios.

CNA Specialty

The following table summarizes the results of operations for CNA Specialty:

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009
(In millions, except %)          

Net written premiums

   $    656         $    672     

Net earned premiums

   654         659     

Net investment income

   147         85     

Net operating income

   115         98     

Net realized investment (gains) losses

   8         (63)    

Net income

   123         35     

Ratios:

     

Loss and loss adjustment expense

   61.5%     60.0%  

Expense

   30.8         28.7     

Dividend

   0.2         0.4     
 

Combined

   92.5%     89.1%  
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010 Compared to 2009

Net written premiums for CNA Specialty decreased $16 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. The decrease in net written premiums was driven by CNA’s architects & engineers, realtors and CNA HealthPro lines of business, as current economic and competitive market conditions have led to decreased insured exposures and lower rates. These conditions may continue to put ongoing pressure on premium and income levels and the expense ratio. Net earned premiums decreased $5 million as compared with the same period in 2009, consistent with the trend of lower net written premiums.

CNA Specialty’s average rate decreased 1% for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared to a decrease of 3% for the three months ended March 31, 2009 for the policies that renewed during those periods. Retention rates of 86% and 85% were achieved for those policies that were available for renewal in each period.

Net income improved $88 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. This improvement was primarily due to improved net realized investment results and improved net operating income. See the Investments section of this MD&A for further discussion of the net realized investment results and net investment income.

Net operating income improved $17 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. This improvement was primarily due to higher net investment income, partially offset by increased expenses.

The combined ratio increased 3.4 points for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. The loss ratio increased 1.5 points primarily due to decreased favorable net prior year development. The expense ratio increased 2.1 points, primarily related to higher underwriting expenses and higher commission rates. Underwriting expenses increased primarily due to IT Transformation costs related to the program to significantly transform CNA’s IT organization and delivery model.

Favorable net prior year development of $29 million was recorded for the three months ended March 31, 2010, compared to favorable net prior year development of $34 million for the same period in 2009. Further information on CNA Specialty net prior year development for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 is included in Note 5 of the Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included under Item 1.

 

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The following table summarizes the gross and net carried reserves for CNA Specialty:

 

      March 31,
2010
   December 31,
2009
(In millions)          

Gross Case Reserves

   $     2,248        $     2,208      

Gross IBNR Reserves

     4,745          4,714      
 

Total Gross Carried Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

   $ 6,993        $ 6,922      
 

Net Case Reserves

   $ 1,818        $ 1,781      

Net IBNR Reserves

     4,113          4,085      
 

Total Net Carried Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

   $ 5,931        $ 5,866      
 
CNA Commercial      

The following table summarizes the results of operations for CNA Commercial:

     
Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009
(In millions, except %)          

Net written premiums

   $     829        $     920      

Net earned premiums

     816          863      

Net investment income

     218          143      

Net operating income

     88          64      

Net realized investment gains (losses)

     12          (108)    

Net income (loss)

     100          (44)    

Ratios:

     

Loss and loss adjustment expense

     73.8%      71.1%  

Expense

     35.6          33.5      

Dividend

     0.1          0.4      
 

Combined

     109.5%      105.0%  
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010 Compared to 2009

Net written premiums for CNA Commercial decreased $91 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. Premiums written were unfavorably impacted by decreased new business and lower retention as a result of competitive market conditions. Current economic conditions have also led to decreased insured exposures, such as in the construction industry due to smaller payrolls and reduced project volume. These conditions may continue to put ongoing pressure on premium and income levels and the expense ratio. Net earned premiums decreased $47 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009, consistent with the trend of lower net written premiums.

CNA Commercial’s average rate increased 1% for the three months ended March 31, 2010, as compared to a decrease of 1% for the three months ended March 31, 2009 for policies that renewed in each period. Retention rates of 79% and 83% were achieved for those policies that were available for renewal in each period.

Net results improved $144 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. This improvement was due to improved net realized investment results and improved net operating income. See the Investments section of this MD&A for further discussion of net realized investment results and net investment income.

Net operating income improved $24 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. This improvement was primarily driven by higher net investment income, partially offset by higher catastrophe losses.

The combined ratio increased 4.5 points for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. The loss ratio increased 2.7 points primarily due to increased catastrophe losses, partially offset by the impact of an improved current accident year non-catastrophe loss ratio. Catastrophe losses were $38 million, or 4.7 points of the loss ratio, for the three months ended March 31, 2010, as compared to $12 million, or 1.4 points of the loss ratio, for the

 

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same period in 2009. The 2009 accident year loss ratio excluding catastrophe losses for the three months ended March 31, 2009 was unfavorably impacted by several significant property losses.

The expense ratio increased 2.1 points for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009, primarily related to the lower net earned premium base. Underwriting expenses were unfavorably impacted by IT Transformation costs related to the program to significantly transform CNA’s IT organization and delivery model.

Favorable net prior year development of $7 million was recorded for the three months ended March 31, 2010, compared to favorable net prior year development of $22 million for the same period in 2009. Further information on CNA Commercial net prior year development for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 is included in Note 5 of the Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included under Item 1.

The following table summarizes the gross and net carried reserves for CNA Commercial:

 

          March 31,    
2010
       December 31,    
2009
(In millions)          

Gross Case Reserves

   $ 6,635        $ 6,510    

Gross IBNR Reserves

     6,345          6,495    
 

Total Gross Carried Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

   $ 12,980        $ 13,005    
 

Net Case Reserves

   $ 5,398        $ 5,269    

Net IBNR Reserves

     5,468          5,580    
 

Total Net Carried Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

   $     10,866        $     10,849    
 

Life & Group Non-Core

The following table summarizes the results of operations for Life & Group Non-Core.

 

Three Months Ended March 31    2010    2009    
(In millions)          

Net earned premiums

   $     145     $     150     

Net investment income

     175       159     

Net operating income (loss)

          (20)    

Net realized investment losses

     (4)      (111)    

Net loss

     (3)      (131)    
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010 Compared to 2009

Net earned premiums for Life & Group Non-Core decreased $5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. Net earned premiums relate primarily to the individual and group long term care businesses.

Net loss decreased by $128 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009. This improvement was primarily due to improved net realized investment results. See the Investments section of this MD&A for further discussion of net realized investment results. In addition, favorable performance on CNA’s remaining pension deposit business and favorable reserve development arising from a commutation of an assumed reinsurance agreement also contributed to the improvement. Partially offsetting these favorable impacts were unfavorable results in CNA’s long term care business.

Certain of the separate account investment contracts related to CNA’s pension deposit business guarantee principal and an annual minimum rate of interest, for which CNA recorded an additional pretax liability in Policyholders’ Funds during 2008 based on the results of the investments supporting this business at that time. During the first quarter of 2009 CNA further increased this pretax liability by $13 million. During the first quarter of 2010, based on improved results from these investments, CNA decreased this pretax liability by $13 million.

 

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Other Insurance

The following table summarizes the results of operations for the Other Insurance segment, including A&E and intrasegment eliminations.

 

Three Months Ended March 31      2010      2009
(In millions)          

Net investment income

   $     50    $     33     

Net operating income (loss)

     2      (2)    

Net realized investment gains (losses)

     3      (28)    

Net income (loss)

     5      (30)    
 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2010 Compared to 2009

Net results improved $35 million for the three months ended March 31, 2010 as compared with the same period in 2009 primarily due to improved net realized investment results and higher net investment income. See the Investments section of this MD&A for further discussion of net investment income and net realized investment results.

Unfavorable net prior year development of $1 million was recorded for the three months ended March 31, 2010. No net prior year development was recorded for the three months ended March 31, 2009. Further information on Other Insurance net prior year development for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 is included in Note 5 of the Consolidated Condensed Financial Statements included under Item 1.

The following table summarizes the gross and net carried reserves for the Other Insurance Segment:

 

      March 31,
2010
       December 31,    
2009

(In millions)

     

Gross Case Reserves

   $ 1,479    $ 1,548    

Gross IBNR Reserves

     2,378      2,458    
 

Total Gross Carried Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

   $     3,857    $     4,006    
 

Net Case Reserves

   $ 952    $ 972    

Net IBNR Reserves

     1,457      1,515    
 

Total Net Carried Claim and Claim Adjustment Expense Reserves

   $ 2,409    $ 2,487    
 

Diamond Offshore

As has been widely reported, on April 20, 2010 a semisubmersible drilling rig, the Deepwater Horizon, owned by a company not affiliated with Diamond Offshore caught fire and sank in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. As a result, oil from the well being worked on at the time has been flowing into the Gulf of Mexico. The cause of this accident has not been determined. We cannot predict at this time the impact that this incident may have on governmental regulation of offshore oil and gas drilling operations or on Diamond Offshore’s operations, financial condition or results of operations in future periods.

The global economy remained relatively weak in the first quarter of 2010 and although oil prices improved to the low $80 per barrel range they remained volatile. Dayrates Diamond Offshore receives for new contracts are no longer at the peak levels achieved at the height of the most recent up-cycle. Given the unpredictable economic environment, the demand for Diamond Offshore services and the dayrates it is able to command could soften further. This volatility and uncertainty could continue until the global economy improves. Absent global economic improvement the decline in drilling activity could be further exacerbated by the influx of new-build rigs over the next several years, particularly in regard to jack-up units.

Early in the economic downturn, Diamond Offshore experienced negative effects of the market such as customer credit problems, customers attempting to renegotiate or terminate contracts, and one customer seeking bankruptcy protection. More recently, Diamond Offshore has experienced declines in dayrates for new contracts with industry wide floater utilization stable at approximately 91%. During the first quarter of 2010, Diamond Offshore signed 14 new contracts totaling approximately $1.5 billion in backlog and ranging in length from one well to five years. As a result, at the end of the first quarter of 2010 its contract backlog was approximately $9.1 billion, which it expects to help mitigate the impact of the current market in 2010.

 

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Contract Drilling Backlog

The following table reflects Diamond Offshore’s contract drilling backlog as of April 19, 2010 and February 1, 2010 (the date reported in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009). Contract drilling backlog is calculated by multiplying the contracted operating dayrate by the firm contract period and adding one half of any

potential rig performance bonuses. Diamond Offshore’s calculation also assumes full utilization of its drilling equipment for the contract period (excluding scheduled shipyard and survey days); however, the amount of actual revenue earned and the actual periods during which revenues are earned will be different than the amounts and periods shown in the tables below due to various factors. Utilization rates, which generally approach 95.0%—98.0% during contracted periods, can be adversely impacted by downtime due to various operating factors including, but not limited to, weather conditions and unscheduled repairs and maintenance. Contract drilling backlog excludes revenues for mobilization, demobilization, contract preparation and customer reimbursables. No revenue is generally earned during periods of downtime for regulatory surveys. Changes in Diamond Offshore’s contract drilling backlog between periods are a function of the performance of work on term contracts, as well as the extension or modification of existing term contracts and the execution of additional contracts.

 

          April 19,    
2010
       February 1,        
     2010        
(In millions)          

High specification floaters (a)

   $ 5,175        $ 4,177        

Intermediate semisubmersible rigs (b)

     3,767          4,030        

Jack-ups

     185          249